The following bibliography has been generated by bringing together all references provided by our content partners. There may be duplication.

References

  • Altringham, J. D. 1996. Bats: biology and behavior. New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Fenton, M. B. 1992. Bats. New York: Facts on File, Inc.
  • Fenton, M. B. 1995. Natural History and Biosonar Signals.In Hearing by Bats. A.N. Popper and R.R. Fay (eds.). New York: Springer-Verlag.
  • Griffiths, T. A., A. Truckenbrod, and P. J. Sponholtz. 1992. Systematics of megadermatid bats (Chriroptera, Megadermatidae), based on hyoid morphology. American Museum Novitates, 3041:1-21.
  • Griffiths, T. A., and A. L. Smith. 1991. Systematics of emballonuroid bats (Chiroptera: Emballonuridae and Rhinpomatidae), based on hyoid morphology. Bulletin American Museum of Natural History, 206:62-83.
  • Grinnell, A. D. 1995. Hearing in bats: an overview. In Hearing by Bats. A.N. Popper and R.R. Fay (eds.). New York: Springer-Verlag.
  • Henson, O. W., Jr. 1970. The central nervous system. In. Biology of Bats. W.A. Wimsatt (eds.). vol2. Pp 58-152.
  • Hill, J. E., and J. D. Smith. 1984. Bats: a natural history. Austin: University of Texas Press.
  • Kirsch, J. A., J. M. Hutcheon, D. G. Byrnes & B. D. Llyod. 1998. Affinites and historical zoogeography of the New Zealand Short0tailed bat, Mystacina tuberculata Gray 1843, inferred from DNA-hybridization comparisons. Journal of Mammalian Evolution 5(1): 33-64.
  • Luckett, W. P. 1980. The use of fetal membrane characters in assessing chiropteran phylogeny. Pp. 245-266 In Proceedings Fifth International Bat Research Conference. D.E. Wilson and A.L. Gardner (eds.). Lubbock, Texas: Texas Tech Press.
  • Novacek, M. J. 1980. Phylogenetic analysis of the chiropteran auditory region. Pp. 317-330 In Proceedings Fifth International Bat Research Conference. D.E. Wilson and A.L. Gardner (eds.). Lubbock, Texas: Texas Tech Press.
  • Novacek, M. J. 1991. Aspects of morphology of the cochlea in microchiropteran bats: an investigation of character transformation. Bulletin American Museum of Natural History, 206:84-100.
  • Pierson, E. D. 1986. Molecular systematics of the Microchiroptera: higher taxon relationships and biogeography. Ph.D. dissertation, University of California, Berkeley, California.
  • Simmons, N. B. & J. H. Geisler. 1998. Phylogenetic relationships of Icaronycteris, Archeonycteris, Hassianycteris, and Palaeochiropteryx to extant bat lineages, with comments on the evolution of echolocation and foraging strategies in microchiroptera. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, 235:1-82.
  • Simmons, N. B. 1998. A reappraisal of interfamilial relationships of bats. In Bats: Phylogeny, Morphology, Echolocation and Conservation Biology. T.H. Kunz and P.A. Racey (eds.). Washington: Smithsonian Institution Press.
  • Smith, J. D. 1976. Chiropteran evolution. Pp. 49-69 In Biology of bat of the New World family Phyllostomatidae, Part I. R.J. Baker, J.K. Jones, and D.C. Carter (eds.). Special Publications of the Museum. No. 10. Lubbock, Texas: Texas Tech University.
  • Van Valen, T. A. 1979. The evolution of bats. Evolutionary Theory, 4:104-121.
  • Wilson, D. E. 1997. Bats in question. Washinton: Smithsonian Institution Press.
  • Wilson, Don E., and DeeAnn M. Reeder, eds. 1993. Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference, 2nd ed., 3rd printing. xviii + 1207

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