Overview

Comprehensive Description

General Description

This group of Dysstroma, consisting of D. citrata, suspectata, walkerata,and truncata, form a complex of species which are often difficult to distinguish without resorting to genitalic characters. D. walkerata is often confused with D. truncata (the two were once considered to be conspecific) or suspectata. D. walkerata is on average the largest of our Dysstroma, with well-defined, relatively pale orange-brown AM and PM bands. It lacks the white flush often seen in D. citrata and truncata, and has a less mottled appearance than citrata and truncata. McDunnough (1946) illustrates the male and female genitalia.  
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Distribution

YT and BC east to Quebec and Labrador (McDunnough 1946).
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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Ecology

Habitat

Coniferous forests in the mountains and northern boreal forest.
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Trophic Strategy

Larvae have been recorded from Larch (Larix laricina), alder (Alnus), willow (Salix) and bog birch (Betula glandulosa) (Handfield 1999).
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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Adults fly in Alberta mid to late July.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Dysstroma walkerata

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 151
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

Not of concern.
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National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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