Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N3 - Vulnerable

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: T5 - Secure

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Wikipedia

Northern ribbon snake

The northern ribbon snake (Thamnophis sauritus septentrionalis) is a subspecies of garter snake. It is one of four subspecies of the ribbon snake (Thamnophis sauritus) and occurs in the United States and Canada in southern Maine, Connecticut, Massachusetts, southern Ontario, Michigan, New York, Nova Scotia, northern Ohio, Illinois, and Indiana. It is listed as a state endangered species in Wisconsin. It is a slender black or brown snake with three bright-yellow or white stripes on its back and sides.[1] The head is black, with the scales alongside the mouth being white. The underside is also white or light yellow. Adult ribbon snakes are 45–65 cm (18–26 in) in length.[1]

Ribbon snakes inhabit marshes or live near the edges of lakes, ponds, and streams. They swim well and their diets include frogs, tadpoles, salamanders, small fish, and insects.

Northern ribbon snakes have from three to 26 young which are born in late summer. The young snakes are 7-9 in long and are colored the same as the adults. As most garter snakes, the mother gives birth to live young (ovoviviparous).

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