Overview

Comprehensive Description

Overview

Siamese Fighting Fish, commonly and incorrectly referred to as Betta fish (this is just a sub-species), inhabit Thai rice paddies in the wild and have become popular pets. They have aggressive behavior (thus the name) and are often hostile towards one another, especially between two males. Males are bigger than females and they have longer fins that almost look like feathers. One unique characteristic of Siamese Fighting Fish are the bubble nests that the male fish make when they breed. They gulp in air with their mouths from the surface, wrap it in a bubble of saliva, and spit the bubbles out continuously until a nest forms. When the female is ready, she emits the eggs and they float up to the bubble nest where they will eventually hatch.

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:42Public Records:30
Specimens with Sequences:40Public Species:22
Specimens with Barcodes:40Public BINs:19
Species:25         
Species With Barcodes:25         
          
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Barcode data

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Macropodinae

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Wikipedia

Macropodinae

Macropodinae is a subfamily of marsupials in the family Macropodidae, which includes the kangaroos, wallabies, and related species. The subfamily includes about ten genera and at least 51 species. It includes all living members of the Macropodidae except for the Banded Hare-wallaby (Lagostrophus fasciatus), the only surviving member of the subfamily Sthenurinae.[1]

Macropodinae includes the following living genera:[1]

Different common names are used for macropodines, including "wallaby" and "kangaroo", with the distinction sometimes based exclusively on size. In addition to the well-known kangaroos, the subfamily also includes other specialized groups, such as the arboreal tree-kangaroos (Dendrolagus), which have body masses between 4 and 13 kg, and a relatively long prehensile tail.[2]

References

  1. ^ a b Wilson, DE, Reeder, DM Mammal Species of the World. Subfamily Macropodinae. Johns Hopkins University Press. Baltimore, 2005.
  2. ^ I. Hume, P. Jarman, M. Renfree and P. Temple-Smith. Fauna of Australia (Walton Richardson, eds.). Vol 1B. 29. Macropodidae. pp. 55-6. 1989.
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