Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 932 specimens in 38 taxa.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 643 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0 - 667
  Temperature range (°C): 6.837 - 27.236
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.033 - 33.933
  Salinity (PPS): 34.240 - 36.754
  Oxygen (ml/l): 0.299 - 6.119
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.046 - 2.301
  Silicate (umol/l): 0.810 - 27.850

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 0 - 667

Temperature range (°C): 6.837 - 27.236

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.033 - 33.933

Salinity (PPS): 34.240 - 36.754

Oxygen (ml/l): 0.299 - 6.119

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.046 - 2.301

Silicate (umol/l): 0.810 - 27.850
 
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:620
Specimens with Sequences:486
Specimens with Barcodes:480
Species:94
Species With Barcodes:88
Public Records:136
Public Species:32
Public BINs:36
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Anthiinae

For the subfamily of beetle, see Anthiinae (beetle).
"Anthias" redirects here. For the genus within the subfamily, see Anthias (genus). For the genus of ground beetle, see Anthia.

Anthias are members of the family Serranidae (basses, basslets, groupers) and make up the subfamily Anthiinae. Anthias make up a sizeable portion of the population of pink, orange and yellow reef fishes seen swarming in most coral reef photography and film.[citation needed]

Anthias are mostly small and are thus quite popular within the ornamental fish trade. They form complex social structures based on the number of males and females and also their position on the reef itself, and are mainly zooplankton feeders. They occur in all tropical oceans and seas of the world. The first species recognized in this group was described in the Mediterranean and northeast Atlantic and was given name Anthias anthias by Carolus Linnaeus in 1758.

Anthias can shoal by the thousands. Anthias do school in these large groups, though they tend toward more intimate subdivisions within the school, appropriately called "harems". These consist of one dominant, colorful male, anywhere from 2-12 females — who have their own hierarchy among them — and up to 2 'subdominant' males, often less brightly colored and non-territorial. Within the swarm of females, territorial males perform acrobatic U-swim displays and vigorously defend an area of the reef and its associated harem.

Anthias are protogynous hermaphrodites. All anthias are born female; if a dominant male perishes, the largest female of the group will often change into a male to take its place. This may lead to squabbling between the next largest male, who sees an opportunity to advance, and the largest female, whose hormones are surging with testosterone.[tone] This can turn quite vicious in the limited confines of captivity.[citation needed]

Seven genera of anthias are known to occur in coral reef ecosystems: Holanthias, Luzonichthys, Nemanthias, Plectranthias, Pseudanthias, Rabaulichthys and Serranocirrhitus. Members of all these genera make it into the aquarium trade, although Pseudanthias is by far the most encountered in the hobby.

Species[edit]

References[edit]

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Anthiinae (beetle)

Anthiinae is a subfamily of beetles in the family Carabidae, containing the following genera:[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Anthiinae Bonelli, 1813". Carabidae of the World. 2011. Retrieved 24 Jun 2011. 
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