Overview

Comprehensive Description

Biology

Adults inhabit shallow algae or weedy reef areas from the intertidal to about 20 m depth (Ref. 42735). Maximum length is based on a straight-line length measurement from upper surface (ignoring spines) of first trunk ring, to tip of tail (Ref. 42735). Ovoviviparous (Ref. 205). The male carries the eggs in a brood pouch which is found under the tail (Ref. 205).
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Distribution

Australia: Shark Bay to Dampier, Western Australia.
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Eastern Indian Ocean: known only from the Shark Bay region of Western Australia.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Dorsal spines (total): 0; Dorsal soft rays (total): 22 - 23; Analspines: 0; Analsoft rays: 4 - 5
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Size

Max. size

10.8 cm OT (male/unsexed; (Ref. 42735))
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Diagnostic Description

Anal fin rays divided at base; tail rings 36-38; subdorsal spines 4/0,0,1,1 or 5/0,0,1,1,1; nose ridge slightly raised, without a spine; spine above eyes moderately large, angled back and laterally outward; lateral head spine moderately large and recurved; coronet slightly raised, apex with 5 blunt diverging spines; upper shoulder-ring spine of small to moderate size, situated beside gill openings; central shoulder-ring spine of moderate size and directed laterally outward; superior trunk and tail ridges with broad thorn-like blunt spines, enlarged on some rings, at regular intervals; superior tail ridge with tubercle-like spines of moderate size, angled backward; trunk ridges followed by connecting tail ridges with spines and tubercles becoming gradually smaller posteriorly; lateral line with distinct pores, on trunk rings just above lateral ridge, continuing onto tail to 18th-23rd tail ring, each pore between raised papillae (Ref. 42735).
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Ecology

Habitat

Environment

demersal; marine; depth range ? - 20 m (Ref. 42735)
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Life History and Behavior

Life Cycle

Male carries the eggs in a brood pouch (Ref. 205).
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Hippocampus biocellatus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 2
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Threats

Not Evaluated
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Wikipedia

Hippocampus biocellatus

The false-eyed seahorse, Hippocampus biocellatus, is a medium-sized species of seahorse that appears to be restricted to the Shark Bay region of Western Australia.[1]

References[edit source | edit]

  1. ^ Rudie H. Kuiter (2001). "Revision of the Australian seahorses of the genus Hippocampus (Syngnathiformes: Syngnathidae) with descriptions of nine new species". Records of the Australian Museum 53 (3): 293–340. doi:10.3853/j.0067-1975.53.2001.1350. 


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