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Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

Trees or climbing or sprawling shrubs, unarmed or bearing prickles. Stipules various. Leaves 2-pinnate; specialised glands on petiole or rhachis 0. Leaflets opposite. Inflorescence of medium to large flowers arranged in a raceme or panicle. Sepals free to the hypanthium. Petals subequal, 5, yellow. Stamens 10, usually all fertile. Pod not winged.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Physical Description

Diagnostic Description

Caesalpinia

Trees or erect or clambering shrubs. Stems usually spiny. Leaves bipinnate; pinnae opposite, the leaflets opposite or alternate; petioles and rachis lacking stipitate glands; stipules minute to foliaceous. Flowers unisexual or bisexual, in axillary or terminal racemes; pedicels articulate in the distal portion. Calyx campanulate, 5-lobate; corolla of various colors, the petals 5, free; stamens 10, the filaments flattened, free, of equal length, the anthers dehiscent along longitudinal sutures; ovary unilocular, superior, sessile or short-stipitate, with numerous ovules. Fruit a legume of various forms, dehiscent or indehiscent; seeds solitary or numerous, of various forms. A tropical genus of about 100 species.

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Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 8 specimens in 2 taxa.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 1 - 1
 
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:156Public Records:56
Specimens with Sequences:108Public Species:24
Specimens with Barcodes:107Public BINs:0
Species:40         
Species With Barcodes:33         
          
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Caesalpinia

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Caesalpinia

Caesalpinia is a genus of flowering plants in the legume family, Fabaceae. Membership within the genus is controversial, with different publications including anywhere from 70 to 165 species, depending largely on the inclusion or exclusion of species alternately listed under genera such as Hoffmannseggia. It contains tropical or subtropical woody plants. The generic name honors the botanist, physician and philosopher Andrea Cesalpino (1519-1603).[3]

The name Caesalpinaceae at family level, or Caesalpinioideae at the level of subfamily, is based on this generic name.

Selected species[edit]

Formerly placed here[edit]

Uses[edit]

Some species are grown for their ornamental flowers. Brazilwood (C. echinata) is the source of a historically important dye called brazilin and of the wood for violin bows. Guayacaú Negro (C. paraguariensis) is used for timber in several Latin American countries, especially Argentina and Paraguay. Commercially it is marketed as Argentinian Brown Ebony, mistakenly as Brazilian Ebony, and as a family group as Partidgewood. End use for this timber is typically high-end exotic hardwood flooring, cabinetry and turnings.

Caesalpinia pluviosa is being investigated as a possible antimalarial medication.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Genus: Caesalpinia L.". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. 2007-04-03. Retrieved 2010-12-03. 
  2. ^ "Caesalpinia L.". TROPICOS. Missouri Botanical Garden. Retrieved 2009-10-19. 
  3. ^ Gledhill, David (2008). The Names of Plants (4 ed.). Cambridge University Press. p. 83. ISBN 978-0-521-86645-3. 
  4. ^ a b "GRIN Species Records of Caesalpinia". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved 2011-04-19. 
  5. ^ "Subordinate Taxa of Caesalpinia L.". TROPICOS. Missouri Botanical Garden. Retrieved 2009-10-19. 
  6. ^ "Caesalpinia". Integrated Taxonomic Information System. Retrieved 2011-04-19. 
  7. ^ Kayano, Ana Carolina; Stefanie CP Lopes; Fernanda G Bueno; Elaine C Cabral; Wanessa C Souza-Neiras; Lucy M Yamauchi; Mary A Foglio; Marcos N Eberlin; João Carlos Mello; Fabio TM Costa (2011). "In vitro and in vivo assessment of the anti-malarial activity of Caesalpinia pluviosa". Malaria Journal 10 (112). doi:10.1186/1475-2875-10-112. PMC 3112450. PMID 21535894. 
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Source: Wikipedia

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