Ecology

Associations

Foodplant / miner
solitary larva of Agromyza lathyri mines leaf of Lathyrus

Foodplant / gall
larva of Anabraemia bellevoyei causes gall of leaf (stipule) of Lathyrus

Foodplant / feeds on
larva of Apion afer feeds on Lathyrus

Foodplant / feeds on
larva of Apion craccae feeds on Lathyrus

Foodplant / internal feeder
larva of Apion pomonae feeds within pod of Lathyrus

Foodplant / gall
larva of Asphondylia lathyri causes gall of pod of Lathyrus

Plant / resting place / on
adult of Bruchus atomarius may be found on Lathyrus

Plant / resting place / within
pupa of Bruchus loti may be found in pod of Lathyrus
Remarks: Other: uncertain

Plant / resting place / within
pupa of Bruchus rufimanus may be found in seed of Lathyrus

Plant / associate
adult of Bruchus rufipes is associated with Lathyrus
Remarks: season: (late 3-)5-6(-11)

Foodplant / gall
larva of Contarinia jaapi causes gall of shoot (terminal) of Lathyrus
Other: sole host/prey

Foodplant / gall
larva of Dasineura lathyricola causes gall of leaflet of Lathyrus

Foodplant / gall
larva of Dasineura pratensis causes gall of inflorescence of Lathyrus

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / open feeder
larva of Hypera suspiciosa grazes on leaf of Lathyrus

Foodplant / feeds on
larva of Kakothrips pisivorous feeds on live flower of Lathyrus
Remarks: season: 6-8

Foodplant / saprobe
fruitbody of Lachnella villosa is saprobic on dead, decayed stem of Lathyrus

Foodplant / miner
larva of Liriomyza congesta mines leaf of Lathyrus
Other: major host/prey

Foodplant / miner
larva of Liriomyza pisivora mines leaf of Lathyrus

Foodplant / feeds on
larva of Odontothrips phaleratus feeds on live flower of Lathyrus
Remarks: season: 7-9

Foodplant / feeds on
pycnidium of Phoma coelomycetous anamorph of Phoma pinodella feeds on Lathyrus

Foodplant / parasite
innate, amphigenous, oblong, indefinite stroma of Placosphaeria coelomycetous anamorph of Placosphaeria onobrychidis parasitises live leaf of Lathyrus

Foodplant / feeds on
larva of Sitona gemellatus feeds on Lathyrus

Foodplant / feeds on
subterranean larva of Sitona lineatus feeds on live root nodule of Lathyrus

Foodplant / feeds on
larva of Tychius quinquepunctatus feeds on Lathyrus

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:198Public Records:126
Specimens with Sequences:190Public Species:53
Specimens with Barcodes:188Public BINs:0
Species:58         
Species With Barcodes:57         
          
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Barcode data

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Lathyrus

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Wikipedia

Lathyrus

Lathyrus /ˈlæθɨrəs/[1] is a genus of flowering plant species known as sweet peas and vetchlings. Lathyrus is in the legume family, Fabaceae, and contains approximately 160 species. They are native to temperate areas, with a breakdown of 52 species in Europe, 30 species in North America, 78 in Asia, 24 in tropical East Africa, and 24 in temperate South America.[2] There are annual and perennial species which may be climbing or bushy. This genus has numerous sections, including Orobus, which was once a separate genus.[3]

Uses[edit]

Many species are cultivated as garden plants. The genus includes the garden sweet pea (Lathyrus odoratus) and the perennial everlasting pea (Lathyrus latifolius). Flowers on these cultivated species may be rose, red, maroon, pink, white, yellow, purple or blue, and some are bicolored. They are also grown for their fragrance. Cultivated species are susceptible to fungal infections including downy and powdery mildew.

Other species are grown for food, including the Indian pea (L. sativus) and the red pea (L. cicera), and less commonly Cyprus-vetch (L. ochrus) and Spanish vetchling (L. clymenum). The tuberous pea (L. tuberosus) is grown as a root vegetable for its starchy edible tuber. The seeds of some Lathyrus species contain the toxic amino acid oxalyldiaminopropionic acid and if eaten in large quantities can cause lathyrism, a serious disease.[4]

Diversity[edit]

Species include:[5]

Harvest of Lathyrus aphaca crop

Jewish Law[edit]

Lathyrus can be mixed with bitter peas without violating the Jewish law of Kilaim.[6]

Ecology[edit]

Lathyrus species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species, including the Grey Chi (Antitype chi) and the Latticed Heath (Chiasmia clathrata), both recorded on meadow vetchling (Lathyrus pratensis), and Chionodes braunella.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Sunset Western Garden Book, 1995:606–607
  2. ^ Asmussen, C. B and A. Liston. (March 1998). "Chloroplast DNA characters, phylogeny, and classification of Lathyrus (Fabaceae)". American Journal of Botany (Botanical Society of America) 85 (3): 387–401. doi:10.2307/2446332. JSTOR 2446332. 
  3. ^ Fred, Edwin Broun; Baldwin, Ira Lawrence; McCoy, Elizabeth (1932). Root Nodule Bacteria and Leguminous Plants. UW-Madison Libraries Parallel Press. p. 142. ISBN 1-893311-28-7. 
  4. ^ Barrow, M. V., et al. (1974). "Lathyrism: A Review". The Quarterly Review of Biology 49 (2): 101–128. doi:10.1086/408017. JSTOR 2820941. PMID 4601279. 
  5. ^ GRIN Species Records of Lathyrus. Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN).
  6. ^ Mishnayot Kilayim 1:1
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