Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

Unarmed trees or shrubs. Leaves paripinnate, without glands on petiole or rhachis. Flowers in many-flowered racemes; bracteoles 2 at base of pedicels. Sepals 5. Petals 5, yellow (in ours). Stamens 10, filaments of 3 lower stamens with an S-bend near the base, many times longer than their small anthers which are dorsifixed. Pod long (30-60 cm in ours), cylindric or elongate.
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Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records: 118
Specimens with Sequences: 141
Specimens with Barcodes: 122
Species: 35
Species With Barcodes: 31
Public Records: 41
Public Species: 19
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Cassia sp. queensland

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 4
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

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Wikipedia

Cassia (genus)

This article is about the legume genus Cassia. For other uses, see Cassia (disambiguation).

Cassia is a genus of flowering plants in the legume family, Fabaceae, and the subfamily Caesalpinioideae. Species are known commonly as cassias. Cassia is also the English common name of some species in the genus Cinnamomum of the family Lauraceae. Many species of genus Senna were previously included in Cassia.[1] Cassia now generally includes the largest species of the legume subtribe Cassiinae, usually mid-sized trees.

Ecology[edit]

Cassia species occur in a range of climates. Some can be utilized widely as ornamental plants. They have been used in reforestation projects, and species from desert climates can be used to prevent desertification.

Cassia species are used as food plants by the caterpillars of many lepidopteran taxa. For example, the skipper Astraptes fulgerator and the pierids Catopsilia pomona and C. pyranthe are all seen on Cassia fistula. The latter utilizes several other cassias, as well.

The plant pathogenic viruses cassia yellow blotch bromovirus and cassia yellow spot potyvirus were first described from Cassia.

Uses[edit]

Because the name Cassia is not precise, it is sometimes difficult to know what is meant by references to plants known as "cassias". Cassia gum, for example, is made from Senna obtusifolia, a species formerly included in genus Cassia.

Genera Cassia and Senna are both known in systems of traditional medicine. Cassia fistula, for example, is used in Ayurvedic medicine.[citation needed]

There exists some culinary use for cassias. The fruit of some species is edible. Some have toxins in their seeds, however.

Systematics and taxonomy[edit]

There are hundreds of Cassia species, but it is unclear just how many. One estimate stands at 692.[2] The genus was a wastebasket taxon for a long time, used to classify plants that did not fit well anywhere else. Over 1000 species have belonged to Cassia over the years.[1] Many taxa have since been transferred to more appropriate genera, such as Senna.

Selected species[1][edit]

Formerly placed here[1][edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Genus Cassia". International Legume Database & Information Service. November 2005. Version 10.01. Retrieved December 20, 2007. 
  2. ^ Frodin, D. G. (2004). "History and concepts of big plant genera". Taxon 53 (3): 753–776. doi:10.2307/4135449. JSTOR 4135449. 
  3. ^ Cassia brewsteri. Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN).
  4. ^ Cassia fistula. Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN).
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