Overview

Comprehensive Description

Biology

Most abundant in small rivers and large streams of barbel zone with riffles and pools. Found along shores of slow-flowing lowland rivers, even in very small mountain streams, and in large lake, undertaking spawning migration to inflowing streams. Adults are solitary while juveniles occur in groups. Feeding larvae and juveniles live in very shallow shoreline habitats. Feed on a wide variety of aquatic and terrestrial animals and plant material. Large individuals prey predominantly on fishes. Breed in fast-flowing water above gravel bottom, rarely among submerged vegetation. Often form fertile hybrids with Alburnus alburnus (Ref. 59043). Popular with amateur sport fishermen. Can be caught with various baits and lures. The flesh is of poor quality (Ref. 38587).
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Distribution

Range Description

North, Baltic, northern Black, White, Barents and Caspian Sea basins, Atlantic basin southward to Adour drainage (France), Great Britain north to 56°N, Scandinavia: southern Finland, Sweden north to about Stockholm. Mediterranean basin from Var to Hérault (possibly Aude) (France) drainages. Introduced elsewhere. Naturally absent from Italy and Adriatic basin.
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Europe and Asia Minor.
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Eurasia: North, Baltic, northern Black, White, Barents and Caspian Sea basins, Atlatinc basins southward to Adour drainages (France), Great Britain north to 56°C, Scandinavia: southern Finland, Sweden north to abut Stockholm. Mediterranean basin from Var to Hérault (possibly Aude) (France) drainages. Introduced elsewhere, Naturally absent from Italy and Adriatic basin.
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Circumglobal in temperate and tropical seas and estuaries (including Mediterranean Sea, Black Sea, Red Sea, Seychelles, Madagascar, Mascarenes, Hawaiian Islands); introduced in some lakes.
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Syria.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Dorsal spines (total): 3; Dorsal soft rays (total): 7 - 9; Analspines: 3; Analsoft rays: 7 - 10; Vertebrae: 42 - 48
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Size

Maximum size: 600 mm TL
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Max. size

60.0 cm SL (male/unsexed; (Ref. 59043)); max. published weight: 8,000 g (Ref. 2196); max. reported age: 22 years (Ref. 41616)
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Diagnostic Description

Differs from its congeners in France, North, Baltic, Arctic, Black and Caspian Sea basins by the possession of the following characters: dorsal profile with a well-marked discontinuity between head and trunk; a row of black pigments along free margin of each flank scale, forming a regular reticulate pattern, with no or very few pigments on central part of scales; anal and pelvic fins orange to red; dorsal fin with 8½ branched rays; anal fin with 8½ branched rays (rarely 9½); scales on lateral line 40-45 + 2-3; mouth terminal, with well marked chin; lower jaw tip not included in the upper lip; interorbital distance 37-42% HL; postorbital distance 47-51% HL; eye diameter 17-22% HL, 1.5-2.3 times in snout length; body depth 22-27% SL; lower jaw long, length greater than depth of operculum; iris whitish; pharyngeal teeth 2,5-5,2; in stretched anal fin of individuals larger than about 15 cm SL, distance between tips of first and last branched rays usually greater than caudal peduncle depth (Ref. 59043). Caudal fin with 19 rays (Ref. 2196).
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
Habitat:
Most abundant in small rivers and large streams of barbel zone with riffles and pools. Also along shores of slow-flowing lowland rivers, even in very small mountain streams. Also in large lakes, undertaking spawning migrations to inflowing streams. Spawns in fast-flowing water above gravel bottom, rarely among submerged vegetation.

Biology:
Juveniles are gregarious, adults more solitary. Lives up to 15 years, females longer than males. Males reproduce for the first time at 2-4 years, females at 4-6. Maturity is influenced by environmental factors and individuals may mature much later. Spawns in May-August, when temperature rises above 12°C. Females spawn more than once during a season. Individual females spawn with several males. Males assemble at spawning grounds and follow ripe females, often with much splashing, to shallow riffles. Females deposit the sticky eggs into the gravel. Feeding larvae and juveniles inhabit very shallow shoreline habitats. Feeds on a wide variety of aquatic and terrestrial animal and plant material. Large individuals become predominantly piscivorous. Frequently forms fertile hybrids with Alburnus alburnus.

Systems
  • Freshwater
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Environment

benthopelagic; potamodromous (Ref. 51243); freshwater; brackish; pH range: 6.0 - 7.8; dH range: 8 - 25; depth range 0 - ? m
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Migration

Potamodromous. Migrating within streams, migratory in rivers, e.g. Saliminus, Moxostoma, Labeo. Migrations should be cyclical and predictable and cover more than 100 km.
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Trophic Strategy

Feeds on plants, invertebrates and detritus (Ref. 6258).
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Life History and Behavior

Life Cycle

Spawning occurs in fast-flowing water above gravel bottom, rarely among submerged vegetation. Female spawn more than once during a season, individual females spawn with several males. Males assemble at spawning site and follow ripe females, often with much splashing, to shallow riffles. Females lays sticky eggs into the gravel (Ref. 59043). Pale yellow eggs are found attached to gravel, weed and stones in flowing water (Ref. 41678).
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Squalius cephalus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 76
Specimens with Barcodes: 91
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Leuciscus cephalus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Barcode data: Squalius cephalus

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 19 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.  Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.  See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

CCTTTATCTTGTATTTGGTGCCTGAGCCGGAATAGTGGGGACTGCCCTAAGCCTCCTTATTCGGGCCGAACTAAGCCAACCCGGGTCACTTTTAGGCGATGACCAAATTTATAATGTCATTGTTACCGCCCACGCCTTCGTAATAATTTTCTTTATAGTAATGCCAATTCTTATTGGGGGATTCGGAAACTGACTTGTCCCGCTAATAATTGGTGCACCCGACATAGCATTCCCACGAATAAATAATATGAGCTTCTGACTTCTACCCCCATCATTCCTACTACTATTAGCCTCTTCTGGTGTTGAGGCTGGGGCCGGAACGGGGTGAACAGTATACCCACCGCTTGCGGGCAATCTTGCTCACGCAGGGGCATCAGTAGATTTAACAATCTTCTCACTCCATCTAGCAGGTGTATCATCAATTTTAGGGGCGGTCAACTTCATTACCACAATTATTAATATAAAACCCCCAGCCATCTCCCAATACCAAACACCTCTCTTTGTATGAGCCGTGCTGGTAACAGCCGTCCTTCTCCTCCTATCATTACCAGTTTTAGCTGCCGGAATTACGATGCTTCTTACAGATCGTAATCTTAATACCACATTCTTCGACCCGGCAGGGGGAGGAGACCCAATCCTATATCAACACTTA
-- end --

Download FASTA File
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2008

Assessor/s
Freyhof, J. & Kottelat, M.

Reviewer/s
Bogutskaya, N., & Smith, K. (IUCN Freshwater Biodiversity Unit)

Contributor/s

Justification
A widespread species with no known major widespread threats.
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Population

Population
Abundant.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
No major threats known.
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Least Concern (LC)
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
No information.
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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Importance

fisheries: minor commercial; gamefish: yes
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Wikipedia

European chub

For European chubs other than this particular species, see Squalius.

The chub[1][2] (Squalius cephalus) is a European species of freshwater fish in the carp family Cyprinidae. It frequents both slow and moderate rivers as well as canals and still waters of various kinds. In North America this species is referred to as the European chub.[1] Other names used for the species include round chub, fat chub, chevin, pollard.[citation needed]

Distribution[edit]

The distribution comprises Albania, Andorra, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iran, Italy, Kazakhstan, Kosovo, Latvia, Lithuania, Macedonia, Moldova, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine, and the United Kingdom.[2]

Fishing for chub[edit]

European chub are popular with anglers due to their readiness to feed, and thus to be caught, in almost any conditions.

Small chub are freely-biting fish which even inexperienced anglers find easy to catch. As they become larger, however, chub become more wary and are easily spooked by noise or visual disturbance. Consequently, large chub (in excess of 2 kg) are keenly sought by anglers who prefer to target specific fish.

The British angling record for chub was broken in May 2007 when Steve White caught a 4.2 kg (9.2 pound) fish from a southern stillwater on a mainline boilie.[3] The chub can reach a maximum length of 60-80 cm (24-31.5 inches).

Tackle[edit]

Small chub can be caught readily on light tackle: fly-fishing gear, a lure rod or a float rod, for example. Lines and hooks can be small but baits are often of a relatively large size due to the chub's "greedy" nature.

Larger chub, especially in floodwater conditions, need to be fished with more substantial tackle: a stiff to moderately stiff rod, a strong line, strong hooks and a large bait. Such enhanced equipment is needed due to the chub's predilection for taking cover in underwater snags. They frequently conceal themselves in deep holes or under the roots of trees, etc., and venture out to feed before returning quickly to cover.

As with most species, chub will readily take any natural bait. In addition to natural baits, however, chub are renowned for their voracious appetite and will often be caught on baits as diverse as cheese, sweetcorn, bread, earthworms, and wasp larvae.

German chub catch from the typical environment

Tactics[edit]

As with many river fish, the best conditions for Chub fishing are when the water is "carrying colour". This means that the clarity of the water has been temporary clouded by mud washing into the river, often following heavy rainfall. Under these conditions a big, smelly bait is the best bet. Lob worms are a particular favourite, as is breadflake or paste. Another smelly favourite for chub are cheese flavours and a flavour called "scopex" which can be sprayed onto your bait.

When rivers are crystal clear or swims are heavily fished, big baits are unlikely to work. In this situation best baits to use are single or double maggot close to, or under, the far bank features like overhanging trees. Use a catapult to fire a healthy helping of loosefeed over your hookbait. Don't use groundbait as Chub hate the stuff! With the maggot method you are attempting to bring the fish into the upper layers of the water and catch them with a waggler "on the drop" (as the hookbait sinks with the loosefeed). In certain waters Chub can become predators and can be caught on spinners or spoons.

When unhooking a Chub with a disgorger be very careful not to poke your fingers into the Chubs mouth as they have sharp/bone crushing pharyngeal teeth at the back of their mouths.

  • Best baits: Maggots, bread, cheese paste and lobworm.
  • Best methods: Legering big baits, waggler and maggot.
  • Habitat: Steady-flowing upper to middle reaches of rivers and sometimes found in still waters such as lakes.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2012). "Leuciscus cephalus" in FishBase. 5 2012 version.
  2. ^ a b World Conservation Monitoring Centre 2010. Squalius cephalus. 2008 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Downloaded on 5 April 2010.
  3. ^ "Chub Record Broken - FishingMagic Catch Reports". 
  4. ^ The Concise Encyclopedia of Fishing by Gareth Purnell, Alan Yates and Chris Dawn
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Squalius cephaloides

Squalius cephaloides is a species of cyprinid fish known only from the Armutlu Peninsula in Turkey.[1]

References [edit]

  1. ^ Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2013). "Squalius cephaloides" in FishBase. February 2013 version.
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