Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:14,840Public Records:2,140
Specimens with Sequences:11,801Public Species:355
Specimens with Barcodes:10,173Public BINs:264
Species:1,731         
Species With Barcodes:1,324         
          
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Barcode data

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Apinae

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Wikipedia

Apinae

The Apinae is the subfamily, that includes the majority of bees in the family Apidae. It includes the familiar "corbiculate" (pollen basket) bees — honey bees, stingless bees, orchid bees, and bumblebees. It also includes all but two of the groups (excluding Nomadinae and Xylocopinae) that were previously classified in the family Anthophoridae.

Most species in the subfamily (other than honey bees, bumblebees, and stingless bees) are solitary, though several of the tribes are entirely cleptoparasitic, such as the Ericrocidini, Isepeolini, Melectini, Osirini, Protepeolini, and Rhathymini.

Tribes[edit source | edit]

Tribes within the subfamily Apina include: [1]

Behaviors[edit source | edit]

Certain behaviors are known from members of the Apinae that are rarely seen in other bees, including the habit of males forming "sleeping aggregations" on vegetation; several males gathering on a single plant in the evening, grasping a plant with their jaws and resting there through the night (sometimes held in place only by the jaws, with the legs dangling free in space).

Also known from Apinae is the habit of gathering floral oils instead of pollen for use as a larval food; this behavior is otherwise known only from a few lineages in the family Melittidae.

References[edit source | edit]

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