Overview

Comprehensive Description

Nesting Biology

Nest in snail shells. Nest plug and cell partitions are made of leaf pulp or mastic (Cane et al. 2007).

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Source: Anthophila – an online repository of bee diversity

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Distribution

occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Global Range: (>2,500,000 square km (greater than 1,000,000 square miles)) Widespread in the eastern United States and southernmost Canada from Minnesota east across southern Ontario to the New England states, south to Texas and North Carolina. See also Discover Life map.

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Physical Description

Type Information

Holotype for Osmia conjuncta Cresson, 1864
Catalog Number: USNM
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Entomology
Sex/Stage: Female;
Preparation: Pinned
Locality: Connecticut, United States
  • Holotype: 1864. Proceedings of the Entomological Society of America. 2: 31.
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Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

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Ecology

Migration

Non-Migrant: No. All populations of this species make significant seasonal migrations.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

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Trophic Strategy

Comments: Apparently a generalist in feeding habits. The Discover Life site lists as host records of Cercis, Dentaria, Fragaria, Geranium, Lupinus and Rubus credited to Mitchell (1962) and Anemonella, Blephilia, Cardamine, Collinsia, Hydrophyllum, Osmorrihiza, Polymonium, Psoralea, Ranunculus, Scutellaria, Stellaria, Trifolium and Viola creidted to Robertson (1929). Others records available on the internet.

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Associations

Flowering Plants Visited by Osmia conjuncta in Illinois

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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: > 300

Comments: This is a guess, no real information.

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General Ecology

This species has specialized nesting habits. It is one of a few species in North America, more in Eurasia, that nest in old snail shells. As far as known it is not known to nest in other substrates.

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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Comments: Activity season varies with latitude, probably usually late spring.

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Osmia conjuncta

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 17
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N4 - Apparently Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

Reasons: A widespread bee, but Cane et al. (2007) report that all three North American species of its subgenus are "uncommon". It is not known to have special habitat needs other than availability of flowers and suitable old snail shells for nesting. No reports of major decline were found, however reliable status information is minimal.

Intrinsic Vulnerability: Unknown

Environmental Specificity: Narrow. Specialist or community with key requirements common.

Comments: Apparently uses many kinds of flowers (Mitchell, 1962), but Cane et al. (2007) report this species to be one of only three North American Osmia known to nest in old snail shells, and one of two not known to use other substrates.

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Global Short Term Trend: Unknown

Global Long Term Trend: Unknown

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Threats

Comments: No major threats are known.

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Management

Global Protection: Unknown whether any occurrences are appropriately protected and managed

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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: In subgenus Diceratosmia, revised by Mitchell (1962).

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