Overview

Comprehensive Description

Nesting Biology

Nest in holes in wood blocks or pithy stems, as well as in abandoned subterranean or surface nests of other wasps (Sceliphron) or bees. Nest plugs and partitions are made with leaf pulp or mastic mixed with mud (Cane et al. 2007).

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Source: Anthophila – an online repository of bee diversity

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Distribution

occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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Global Range: (200,000-2,500,000 square km (about 80,000-1,000,000 square miles)) A 1974 specimen from Prince William County, Virginia certainly does not represent a native population. Otherwise the historic range, based mostly on Discover Life, includes western Nebraska (three ancient specimens without years and one from 1988) through Wyoming and parts of Montana to Kaslo, British Columbia and farther west to Yakima (1940) and Kittitas (1949) Counties in Washington, Oregon Jefferson Co. 1950), south through all of the western states as far as Cibola, San Juan, and Catron Counties, New Mexico and Apache County, Arizona (all four in 1989) and San Diego County, California in 1916. This is one of only four species of Osmia that Kearns and Oliveras (2009) did encounter in their Boulder County inventory and Scott et al. (2011) report it from 21 counties in Colorado, with at least three others verified since 2000, Larimer, Conejos, and Archuleta. This was not among 26 species of Osmia found in 2004 by Wilson et al. (2010) in Okanogan County, Washington. Rightmyer and Griswold (2010) do not list it for the southeastern Arizona region, despite 1972 and 1989 records from Apache County. So it might not occur regularly there. As with most species of Osmia, Nevada specimens are from the late 1960s and 1970s. Based on over 70 out of well over 100 records from Discover Life, about 10% of mapped localities are from the 1980s or more recently, including those just noted and Mariposa County, California in 2006. There were also records from Cache County, Utah and Benton County, Washington in 1995, Fremont County, Wyoming in 1999, and Riverside County, California in 1996. Discover Life records suggest that as of 1987-1989 the range had changed very little. However the current range may be substantially less.

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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Physical Description

Type Information

Type for Osmia bruneri Cockerell, 1897
Catalog Number: USNM 536706
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Entomology
Sex/Stage: Female;
Preparation: Pinned
Locality: Colo. Springs, Colorado, United States
  • Type: 1897. Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia. 49: 337.
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Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

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Ecology

Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: Unknown

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Osmia bruneri

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 12
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Conservation

Conservation Status

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GU - Unrankable

Reasons: This species was, and may still be, widespread across the West. However, apparently well under 10% of records are after 1987-1989, even though the species was collected nearly range-wide during those three years. It appears to still be fairly widespread in Colorado and adjacent Wyoming, but there are very few records after 1996 elsewhere. Taken at face value the paucity of recent records suggests a substantial decline, but more information is needed to verify this.

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National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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Global Short Term Trend: Unknown

Global Long Term Trend: Decline of 10-50%

Comments: There is some uncertainty, but this bee seems to have been collected much more widely in 1987-1989, than later, i.e. from Nebraska to Oregon, New Mexico (three counties in 1989), Arizona, Utah, Glenn County, California, that is essentially its entire known range except southern California, where it was collected a few years earlier (e.g. San Bernardino County in 1983) and later. There are mid 1990s records from Washington (Garfield and Benton Counties), Utah, and Riverside County, California; since then Fremont County, Wyoming in 1999, and post 2000 records from four Counties in Colorado and the Yosemite region in Mariposa County, California (2005-2006). Except for Mariposa County, records after 1996 suggest that this species has become rare except in Colorado and maybe Wyoming.

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