Overview

Comprehensive Description

Nesting Biology

Nest in holes in wood blocks or pithy stems. Nest plugs and partitions are made with leaf pulp or mastic (Cane et al. 2007).

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Source: Anthophila – an online repository of bee diversity

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Distribution

Global Range: (200,000-2,500,000 square km (about 80,000-1,000,000 square miles)) This species ranges from South Dakota (historic) to the Vancouver area (most recently in 2004) and south widely through all of the western states to San Diego County, California (most recently 1988), northern Nevada (1970s), and Otero County, New Mexico (1970). Wilson et al. (2010) found this species in their Okanogan County, Washington inventory in 2004. Kearns and Oliveras (2009) did not find it in their Boulder County, Colorado efforts and Rightmyer and Griswold (2010) do not list the species from southeastern Arizona and adjacent New Mexico, but Discover Life maps two 1970 records from Apache County. Scott et al. (2011) list 19 counties in Colorado and several of these have post-2000 records mapped by Discover Life. There are two old (1916 and 1925) records from Quebec and New York mapped by Discover Life, but not included in the range by Krombein et al. (1979), and a disjunct (1988) record from Morrill County, Nebraska. Populations in Oregon and California are listed as subspecies O. a. visenda by Krombein et al. (1979).

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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Osmia albolateralis

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 10
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Conservation

Conservation Status

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

Reasons: Osmia albolateralis albolaterlis is still a widespread bee in much of the western USA, although there appear to be very few records of subspecies O. a. visenda since the 1980s. Since the former occupies by far most of the range, the species as a whole does not appear to be imperiled.

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National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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Global Short Term Trend: Unknown

Global Long Term Trend: Relatively stable to decline of 30%

Comments: This assesment is for range extent. The status of subspecies O. albolateralis visenda of Oregon and California needs to be assessed, but the typical subspecies still occurs widely north and east of Nevada. Records from 1998 through 2010 records include at least Wyoming, Washington, Bristish Columbia, Colorado, Utah. Records in southern Arizona are also quite old (1970). Presumably the 2006 record for Mariposa County, California would be O. albolateralis visenda.

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Management

Biological Research Needs: Assess validity and status of subspecies visenda.

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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Krombein et al. (1979) list Osmia albolateralis visenda Sandhouse as a subspecies. This occurs in California and Oregon, with the nominotypical subspecies in the rest of the range.

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Disclaimer

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