Overview

Comprehensive Description

Characteristics

The Ecitoninae are characterized by the following derived traits (Bolton 2003):
  • Orifices of abdominal spiracles IV-VII directed posteriorly
  • Pygidium small or very small, usually merely a narrow U-shaped sclerite
  • Male with sharply defined presclerites on abdominal segments IV-VII; abdominal sternite VII hypertrophied; abdominal sternite VIII internalized and bilobate apically
  • Male biaculeate hypopygium mostly or entirely exposed
  • Basal ring of male genital capsule hypertrophied

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:645Public Records:206
Specimens with Sequences:522Public Species:38
Specimens with Barcodes:420Public BINs:43
Species:93         
Species With Barcodes:73         
          
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Ecitoninae

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Wikipedia

Ecitoninae

Eciton burchellii with larvae of a raided wasp nest

The Ecitoninae are an army ant subfamily most prevalent in the Neotropical region. All species are nomadic and predatory,[1] and most New World army ants belong to this subfamily.

The Ecitoninae are further divided into two groups in the New World, the tribes Cheliomyrmecini and Ecitonini. The former contains only the genus Cheliomyrmex, and the latter contains four genera, Neivamyrmex, Nomamyrmex, Labidus, and Eciton, the genus after which the group is named.[2] The genus Neivamyrmex is the largest of all army ant genera, containing some 120 species, all in the United States. The most predominant species of Eciton is E. burchellii, common name is "army ant", which is considered to be the archetypal species.

Tribes and genera[edit]

Identification[edit]

Workers can be recognized by these features:[1]

  • the eye is reduced to a single ommatidium, or is absent
  • the clypeus narrows (back to front), so the antennal insertions are close to the anterior margin of the head
  • the antennal sockets are not concealed by frontal carinae
  • the pygidium is simple and unarmed.

In addition, the pronotum and mesonotum are fused into a single structure, and the sting is present and functional. The postpetiole may be present or absent. Most of these features, except the simple pygidium, are seen in some species of the subfamily Cerapachyinae.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Subfamily: Ecitoninae". antweb.org. AntWeb. Retrieved 13 October 2013. 
  2. ^ Brady, S. N. G. (2003). "Evolution of the army ant syndrome: the origin and long-term evolutionary stasis of a complex of behavioral and reproductive adaptations". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 100 (11): 6575–6579. Bibcode:2003PNAS..100.6575B. doi:10.1073/pnas.1137809100. PMC 164488. PMID 12750466.  edit
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