Overview

Brief Summary

Introduction

The Dolichoderinae share the following characters with the Aneuretinae and Formicinae (Bolton 2003):
  • Dorsal cuticular flap of the metapleural gland anteriorly reduced and posteromedially extended
  • Petiole with complete tergosternal fusion
  • Postpygidial glands absent
Synapomorphies of the Dolichoderinae are listed by Bolton (2003):
  • Slit-like junction of pygidium and hypopygium
  • Sting vestigial
  • Pygidial glands producing cyclopenanoid monoterpenes (iridoids)
  • Larvae with reduced hairs
  • Reduced (sensilliform) larval maxillary palp and galea
  • Small larval sericteries and reduced larval neck

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Comprehensive Description

SUBFAMILY DOLICHODERINAE HNS FOREL

This subfamily includes fifteen genera with the greatest number of species distributed through the tropics. The sting is vestigial or absent but many species have poison glands that excrete a repellent fluid through the anal orifice. The gaster has a reduced number of segments compared with Formicinae HNS and Ponerinae of which four only are visible in dorsal view in the female castes and five in the males. Pupae are not protected by cocoons. The two genera treated here both belong in the tribe Tapinomini HNS .

Keys to genera of Dolichoderinae HNS

Queens and workers

1 Petiole scale well developed, not obscured by overhanging gaster; front border of clypeus convex and entire (Fig. 20)................................. Iridomyrmex HNS Mayr (p. 33)

- Petiole a small node overhung by first gastral segment; front border of clypeus straight, incised or concave (Fig. 22) ............................ Tapinoma HNS Forster (p. 34)

Males

1 Petiole scale well developed. Scape short, not reaching occipital margin Iridomyrmex HNS Mayr (p. 33)

- Petiole a reduced node. Scape long, overreaching occipital margin Tapinoma HNS Forster (p. 34)

  • Collingwood, C. A. (1979): The Formicidae (Hymenoptera) of Fennoscandia and Denmark. Fauna Entomologica Scandinavica 8, 1-174: 32-33, URL:http://antbase.org/ants/publications/6175/6175.pdf
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Plazi

Source: Plazi.org

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records: 4150
Specimens with Sequences: 3487
Specimens with Barcodes: 2904
Species: 303
Species With Barcodes: 223
Public Records: 689
Public Species: 95
Public BINs: 170
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Dolichoderinae

Dolichoderinae is a subfamily of ants, which includes species such as the Argentine ant (Linepithema humile), the erratic ant, the odorous house ant, and the cone ant. The subfamily presents a great diversity of species throughout the world, distributed in different biogeographic regions, from the Palearctic, Nearctic, Afrotropical region and Malaysia, to the Middle East, Australian, and Neotropical regions.[2]

This subfamily is distinguished by having a single petiole (no post-petiole) and a slit-like orifice, from which chemical compounds are released, rather than the round acidopore encircled by hairs that typifies the family to which it belongs, Formicidae. Dolichoderine ants do not possess a sting, unlike ants in some other subfamilies, such as Ponerinae and Myrmicinae, instead relying on the chemical defensive compounds produced from the anal gland.[3]

Of the compounds produced by dolichoderine ants, several terpenoids were identified including the previously unknown iridomyrmecin, isoiridomyrmecin, and iridodial.[4] Such compounds are responsible for the smell given off by ants of this subfamily when crushed or disturbed.

Tribes and genera[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bolton, B. (2013), "An online catalog of the ants of the world.", AntCat, retrieved 1 October 2013 
  2. ^ Cardoso, D.; Cristiano, M. P.; Barros, L. S.; Lopes, D.; Pompolo, S. (2012). "First cytogenetic characterization of a species of the arboreal ant genus Azteca Forel, 1978 (Dolichoderinae, Formicidae)". Comparative Cytogenetics 6 (2): 107. doi:10.3897/CompCytogen.v6i2.2397.  edit
  3. ^ Fisher, Brian L. and Stefan P. Cover (2007) Ants of North America: a guide to the genera
  4. ^ Wilson, E. O.; Pavan, M. (1959). "Glandular Sources and Specificity of Some Chemical Releasers of Social Behavior in Dolichoderine Ants". Psyche: A Journal of Entomology 66 (4): 70. doi:10.1155/1959/45675.  edit
  • This article incorporates text from a scholarly publication published under a copyright license that allows anyone to reuse, revise, remix and redistribute the materials in any form for any purpose: Cardoso, D.; Cristiano, M. P.; Barros, L. S.; Lopes, D.; Pompolo, S. (2012). "First cytogenetic characterization of a species of the arboreal ant genus Azteca Forel, 1978 (Dolichoderinae, Formicidae)". Comparative Cytogenetics 6 (2): 107. doi:10.3897/CompCytogen.v6i2.2397.  edit Please check the source for the exact licensing terms.
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