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Overview

Brief Summary

Aedes is a genus of small mosquitoes that usually have black and white stripes on their bodies and legs. First described and named by Meigen in 1818, the name comes from the Ancient Greek aēdēs, meaning "unpleasant" or "odious". The genus Aedes is undergoing taxonomic reorganization according to recent morphological analyses by Reinert et al. Because the species involved in these reorganizations are of medical and public health importance, associated name changes have been ignored by most scientists; at least one scientific journal, the Journal of Medical Entomology, has officially encouraged authors dealing with aedine mosquitoes to continue to use the traditional names, unless they have particular reasons for doing so. In the old classification (used here), the genus Aedes includes about 900 species.

These mosquitoes were originally found only in tropical and subtropical zones, but are now found world-wide in all faunal regions, where they have been spread by humans. Some species of this genus transmit serious diseases, including dengue fever and yellow fever and other arboviruses. A few species also transmit the helminths that cause Brugian and Bancroftian filariasis. A few of the important disease vector species are:

Aedes aegypti, the classical vector of urban yellow fever and dengue fever viruses in tropical regions,

A. africanus and A. bromeliae, which transmit yellow fever virus in Africa

A. albopictus, vector of dengue fever virus in the Oriental Region and recently introduced into the USA, Central America, Brazil, southern Europe (Albania and Italy), and Africa (Nigeria)

A. vigilax transmits Bancroftian filariasis in New Caledonia and several viruses (e.g., Ross River virus) in Australia.

A. sierrensis and A. atlanticus are important vectors of dog heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis) in North America.

(Editors of The Journal of Medical Entomology; Polaszek 2006; Wikipedia 2011; Wikipedia 2011b; WRBU)

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Ecology

Associations

Flowering Plants Visited by Aedes spp. in Illinois

Aedes spp. Meigen: Culicidae, Diptera
(observations are from Thien & Utech and Luer)

Orchidaceae: Platanthera flava sn (Lu), Platanthera obtusata sn (TU)

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Known prey organisms

Aedes (Aedes sp. 22) preys on:
detritus
dissolved organic matter
suspended organic matter

Based on studies in:
England (Plant substrate, Treeholes)
Australia (Plant substrate, Treeholes)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • R. L. Kitching, 1983. Community structure in water-filled treeholes in Europe and Australia -- comparisons and speculations. In: Phytotelmata: Terrestrial Plants as Hosts for Aquatic Insect Communities, J. H. Frank and L. P. Lounibos, Eds. (Plexus Pub
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Known predators

Aedes (Aedes sp. 22) is prey of:
Lechriodus fletcheri
Anatopynia

Based on studies in:
Australia (Plant substrate, Treeholes)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • R. L. Kitching, 1983. Community structure in water-filled treeholes in Europe and Australia -- comparisons and speculations. In: Phytotelmata: Terrestrial Plants as Hosts for Aquatic Insect Communities, J. H. Frank and L. P. Lounibos, Eds. (Plexus Pub
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:9,455Public Records:1,308
Specimens with Sequences:8,883Public Species:101
Specimens with Barcodes:8,553Public BINs:91
Species:174         
Species With Barcodes:113         
          
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Aedes sp. KHH7

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Aedes sp. KHH6

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Aedes sp. KHH5

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Aedes sp. KHH1

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Aedes sp. KHH3

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Aedes sp. KHH4

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 3
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Aedes sp. KHH2

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Aedes sp3pk

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 3
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Aedes sp2pk

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 9
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Aedes sp.

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 12
Specimens with Barcodes: 13
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Barcode data: Aedes sp.

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


No available public DNA sequences.

Download FASTA File
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Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:18Public Records:0
Specimens with Sequences:16Public Species:0
Specimens with Barcodes:15Public BINs:0
Species:3         
Species With Barcodes:3         
          
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Barcode data

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Acartomyia

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Aedes

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Wikipedia

Aedes

This article is about the genus of mosquito. For other meanings, see Aedes (disambiguation).

Aedes is a genus of mosquitoes originally found in tropical and subtropical zones, but now found on all continents excluding Antarctica. Some species have been spread by human activity. Aedes albopictus, a most invasive species, was recently spread to the New World, including the US, by the used-tire trade. First described and named by Meigen in 1818, the generic name comes from the Ancient Greek ἀηδής, aēdēs, meaning "unpleasant" or "odious". Some species of this genus transmit serious diseases, including dengue fever, yellow fever, and chikungunya. In Polynesia, the species Aedes polynesiensis is responsible for the transmission of human lymphatic filariasis.

Aedes can be detected and monitored by ovitraps.

The yellow fever mosquito (Aedes aegypti) genome was sequenced by the Broad Institute and The Institute for Genomic Research. The initial assembly was released in August 2005; a draft sequence of the genome and preliminary analysis was published in June 2007.[1] The annotated genome is available at VectorBase.[2]

Characteristics[edit]

Aedes species are typical small mosquitoes. They usually have black and white stripe markings on their body and legs. They usually bite only during the day.

Role in disease[edit]

Members of the Aedes genus are known vectors for numerous viral infections. The two most prominent species that transmit viruses are Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus which transmit the viruses that cause dengue fever, yellow fever, West Nile fever, chikungunya, and eastern equine encephalitis, along with many other, less notable diseases. Infections with these viruses are typically accompanied by a fever, and, in some cases, encephalitis, which can lead to death. A vaccine to provide protection from yellow fever exists, and measures to prevent mosquito bites include: insecticides such as DDT, mosquito traps, insect repellents, and mosquito nets.

Systematics and phylogeny[edit]

Stegomyia pia, a recently described new species[3]

The genus was named by Johann Wilhelm Meigen in 1818. As historically defined, the genus contains over 700 species (see the list of Aedes species). The genus has been divided into several subgenera (Aedes, Diceromyia, Finlaya, Stegomyia, etc.), most of which have been recently treated by some authorities as full genera.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nene V, Wortman JR, Lawson D, et al. (2007). "Genome sequence of Aedes aegypti, a major arbovirus vector". Science 316 (5832): 1718–23. doi:10.1126/science.1138878. PMC 2868357. PMID 17510324. 
  2. ^ "Aedes aegypti". VectorBase. Retrieved 3 November 2013. 
  3. ^ Le Goff, G.; Brengues, C.; Robert, V. (2013). "Stegomyia mosquitoes in Mayotte, taxonomic study and description of Stegomyia pia n. sp.". Parasite 20: 31. doi:10.1051/parasite/2013030. PMC 3770211. PMID 24025625. 
  4. ^ John F. Reinert, Ralph E. Harbach & Ian J. Kitching (2004). "Phylogeny and classification of Aedini (Diptera: Culicidae), based on morphological characters of all life stages" (PDF). Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society 142 (3): 289–368. doi:10.1111/j.1096-3642.2004.00144.x. 
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