Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records: 42093
Specimens with Sequences: 38852
Specimens with Barcodes: 35804
Species: 5352
Species With Barcodes: 4654
Public Records: 10699
Public Species: 1340
Public BINs: 1564
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Wikipedia

Larentiinae

Larentiinae moths contain roughly 5,800 species[2] and occur mostly in the temperate regions of the world. They are generally considered a subfamily of the geometer moth family (Geometridae) and divided into a few large or good-sized tribes, and numerous very small or even monotypic ones which might not always be valid. Well-known members are the "pug moths" of the Eupitheciini and the "carpets", mainly of the Cidariini and Xanthorhoini.

Systematics and description[edit]

Morphological and DNA sequence data indicate that they are a very ancient lineage of geometer moths; in fact, they might even be distinct enough to warrant elevation to full family status in the superfamily Geometroidea. They share numerous plesiomorphic traits – for example at least one areola in the forewing, a hammer-shaped ansa of the tympanal organ and the lack of a gnathos – with the Sterrhinae which are either somewhat less distant from other geometer moths or are part of the same distinct lineage; in fact, the Lythriini were until recently placed in the Larentiinae but are apparently Sterrhinae.[3]

But the Larentiinae characteristically tend to have much longer foreleg tarsi and hindleg tibiae than their relatives, and also have hairy or toothed extensions on the upper side sections of the transtilla; their caterpillars often have the abdominal prolegs reduced already (as is typical for the more advanced geometer moths), and the Larentiinae's tympanal organs have a unique and characteristic structure.[3]

Selected genera and species[edit]

Genera incertae sedis[edit]

Several genera have hitherto not been definitely assigned to a tribe.[4] These include:

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ Forum Herbulot (2008)
  2. ^ Õunap et al. (2008)
  3. ^ a b Õunap et al. (2008), Young (2008)
  4. ^ See references in Savela (2008)

References[edit]

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Cosmorhoe

Cosmorhoe (Cosmorhoe ocellata) is a genus of moth in the family Geometridae and of the species Larentiinae. It is commonly found throughout the United Kingdom. It has a wingspan of 20-25 millimeters, black and white in color. This smallish member of the 'carpets' has a velvety look to the forewings. Their black and white wings are their most recognizable feature, characterized by the fact that they are attracted to light. It was found by Carl Linnaeus in 1752.

They are mostly take to the air in between the times of May and August, usually leaving two generations in the south, and a single brood farther north.

Selected species[edit]

References[edit]

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