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Colydiinae

The Colydiinae are a subfamily of beetles, commonly known as cylindrical bark beetles. They have been treated historically as a family Colydiidae, but have recently been moved into the Zopheridae, where they constitute the bulk of the diversity of the newly expanded family, with about 140 genera worldwide. They are diverse for example in the Australian region, from where about 35 genera are known; in Europe, though, only 20 genera are found and many of these only with few species.[1]

Little is known about the biology of these beetles. Most feed on fungi, others are carnivores and eat small arthropods such as bark beetles[2]

Systematics and taxonomy[edit]

Up to 9 tribes are accepted by various authors; others, however, synonymize some of these. Formerly, many additional tribes were recognized, but the Synchitini, for example, are today generally held to include a number of these tribes, and are even sometimes merged into the Colydiini.[3]

Whether Pycnomerus terebrans of the "Pycnomerini" is a cylindrical bark beetle is not yet resolved

The tribes are:

Delimitation of the Colydiinae against the other lineages of Zopheridae is usually unproblematic. The only significant case of dispute may be the Pycnomerini, which is a small lineage of Zopheridae incertae sedis and was formerly considered an independent family like the "Colydiidae". That treatment is almost certainly wrong, but whether these beetles should be placed in Zopheridae as an additional subfamily Pycnomerinae, or treated as tribe Pycnomerini – and if the latter, whether they are better included in the Colydiinae or the Zopherinae – is still disputed.

Selected genera[edit]

Genera of cylindrical bark beetles include:[verification needed]

Orthocerus clavicornis of the disputed tribe Orthocerini
Synchita variegata of the disputed tribe Synchitini

The genera Pycnomerodes, Pycnomerus and Rhizonium are sometimes included in the Colydiinae too. Other authors consider the latter incertae sedis among the Tenebrionoidea; for the former two, see above.

See also[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ Ślipiński & Lawrence (1999), Ivie (2002), ABRS (2010), FE (2011)
  2. ^ Hawkeswood (1987): 38–39
  3. ^ ABRS (2010), and see references in Savela (2004)

References[edit]

Unreviewed

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