Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Ecology

Associations

Known prey organisms

Pseudolucanus capreolus (Pseudolucanus capreolus larvae) preys on:
Pinus

Based on studies in:
USA: North Carolina (Forest, Plant substrate)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • H. E. Savely, 1939. Ecological relations of certain animals in dead pine and oak logs. Ecol. Monogr. 9:321-385, from pp. 335, 353-56, 377-85.
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Wikipedia

Lucanus capreolus

Lucanus capreolus (commonly known as Reddish-brown Stag Beetle[1]) is a beetle of the Family Lucanidae. The species name "capreolus" is derived from Latin, meaning "Roe Deer" ("capreolus" literally means "little goat"). The name refers to the resemblance of the antennae to deer antlers.[2]

Contents

Description

A relatively large lucanid beetle of the genus Lucanus, with male having long, curved upper jaws, resembling a sickle. The larvae are found in the trunks of old trees, feeding on the inner wood. Dark reddish brown with smooth, shiny elytra; femora orange-brown. Males have much larger jaws than females. Jaws of male not as large as those of Lucanus elaphus. The smaller L. placidus has two or more teeth on jaws and has the femora dark. Size: 22-35 mm

Was originally described by Linnaeus as Scarabaeus capreolus in 1763. (orig. comb.). Other known synonymies are:[3]

  • L. dama Fabricius 1775: 2.
  • L. trigonus Thunberg, 1806: 199.
  • L. muticus Thunberg, 1806: 205.

As with most of the species of the Lucanidae, there is a pronounced sex dimorphism, and the male of Lucanus capreolus is larger than the female and armed with the antennae in the form of antlers.

Habitat

It lives in deciduous forests and adjacent areas[4]in the Eastern United States and some parts of Canada. Could be found around decaying logs and stumps, where it breeds. Males use mandibles to fight at breeding sites. Eggs are deposited in rotting wood. Larvae live in decaying wood of deciduous trees. It is reported that larvae take two years to develop, and pupate in nearby soil. Attracted to lights at night.[4]

See also

References

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