Overview

Brief Summary

North American Ecology (US and Canada)

Satyrium calanus is resident throughout the eastern United states and into southern Canada, and also in two distinct populations further west (Scott 1986). Habitats are open deciduous woodland from gulf coast to lower Canadian zone. Host plants are trees in multiple families, including Fagaceae, Juglandaceae, Rosaceae, Aceraceae and Oleaceae. Eggs are laid on host twigs. Individuals overwinter as eggs. There is one flight each year with the approximate flight time July1-Aug15 in the northern part of the range and late Apr.- early June in the southern part of their range (Scott 1986).
  • Scott, J. A. 1986. The butterflies of North America. Stanford University Press.
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Distribution

occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Global Range: (>2,500,000 square km (greater than 1,000,000 square miles)) S. Canada, south to Gulf of Mexico, Texas, New Mexico, and Wyoming.

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Physical Description

Type Information

Type for Thecla auretorum Boisduval, 1852
Catalog Number: USNM
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Entomology
Collector(s): Lorquin
Locality: Californie. Date:Unknown, California, United States
  • Type:
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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: A forest, woodland and barrens species. Adults fly into open habitats such as old fields for nectar but these are not breeding habitats.

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Migration

Non-Migrant: No. All populations of this species make significant seasonal migrations.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

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Associations

Flowering Plants Visited by Satyrium calanus in Illinois

Satyrium calanus Hübner: Lycaenidae, Lepidoptera
(observations are from Robertson and Graenicher; this butterfly is the Banded Hairstreak)

Anacardiaceae: Rhus glabra [stam sn] (Rb); Apiaceae: Pastinaca sativa sn (Rb); Apocynaceae: Apocynum cannabinum [plab sn] (Rb); Asclepiadaceae: Asclepias purpurascens [plab sn] (Rb), Asclepias syriaca [plab sn] (Rb); Asteraceae: Achillea millefolium sn (Gr), Arnoglossum muhlenbergii sn (Gr), Aster furcatus sn (Gr), Cirsium arvense sn (Gr), Rudbeckia hirta sn (Gr), Solidago canadensis sn (Gr); Rhamnaceae: Ceanothus americanus sn (Rb)

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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 81 to >300

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Global Abundance

10,000 to >1,000,000 individuals

Comments: Population size quite variable, commonly changes by 100-fold from year to year in any given area.

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Life History and Behavior

Behavior

Adults sip nectar of flowers (especially yellow and white). Males perch for females (Scott, 1986).
  • Scott, J. A. 1986. The butterflies of North America. Stanford University Press.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Satyrium calanus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 6
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Reasons: Widespread and abundant. Subspecies FALACER a solid T5.

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Threats

Degree of Threat: D : Unthreatened throughout its range, communities may be threatened in minor portions of the range or degree of variation falls within natural variation

Comments: Florida subspecies CALANUS being reduced in habitat by developme nt of peninsular highlands.

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Management

Global Protection: Many to very many (13 to >40) occurrences appropriately protected and managed

Comments: Many EOs in parks and preserves.

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Wikipedia

Satyrium calanus

The Banded Hairstreak (Satyrium calanus) is a butterfly in the family Lycaenidae.

Appearance, behaviour and distribution[edit]

The Banded Hairstreak is a common hairstreak east of the Rocky Mountains in North America. It is a territorial butterfly that will challenge other butterflies invading its territory.


Life cycle and foodplants[edit]

Eggs are laid singly on the host plants and hatch in the spring. Host plants include black oak and hickory. There is a single brood which flies early June to late August.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nielsen, Mogens C. (1999). "Harvesters, Coppers, Hairstreaks, Blues". Michigan Butterflies & Skippers A Field Guide and Reference. Michigan State University Extension. p. 73. ISBN 1-56525-012-5. 
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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Unlikely "subspecies" FALACER is really a single species. For now includes S. FALACER and S. WITTFELDII. Extremely variable; southern populations may be distinct. In much of range there are early flying hickory-walnut feeding populations and later oak feeding populations in close parapatrym in the same counties, if not sympatry, with many individuals of the latter recognizable by adult wing characters.

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