Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 4 specimens in 5 taxa.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0.5 - 1

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 0.5 - 1
 
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:265Public Records:173
Specimens with Sequences:224Public Species:0
Specimens with Barcodes:224Public BINs:22
Species:3         
Species With Barcodes:1         
          
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Barcode data

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Dermogenys

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Wikipedia

Dermogenys

The freshwater and brackish water viviparous halfbeaks of the genus Dermogenys are widely distributed in South and Southeast Asia from India to Indonesia. They are all viviparous, producing small clutches of up to 30 fry that closely resemble the adults, except they are much smaller, around 10 to 15 mm in length. Dermogenys adults are typically around 60–70 mm in length, with females being slightly larger than males. Males tend to be more brightly coloured and are well known for being aggressive towards one another. The wrestling halfbeak, Dermogenys pusilla, is widely used in Asia as fighting animals upon which wagers are placed (see Siamese fighting fish). Both sexes have lower jaws (mandibles) that are much longer than the upper ones, and from this comes the "halfbeak" name.

Dermogenys fish feed extensively on small insects, either in the form of aquatic larvae or as flying insects that have fallen onto the surface of the water. They are important predators on insects such as mosquitoes, so play a role in controlling malaria.

Reproduction[edit source | edit]

A three-week old Dermogenys fry.

Dermogenys are live-bearing fish that practise internal fertilisation. The male is equipped with a gonopodium-like anal fin known as an andropodium that delivers sperm into the female. The gestation period is about one month. The exact mode of reproduction ranges from ovoviviparity through to viviparity (see section on reproduction in the halfbeak article). About ten embryos are developed at any one time, but at birth, these are fairly large (around 10 mm) compared with other fish of this size (Dermogenys adults are around 4–7 cm in length, depending on the species).

Species[edit source | edit]

There are currently 12 recognized species in this genus: [1]

See also[edit source | edit]

Further reading[edit source | edit]

References[edit source | edit]

  1. ^ Froese, Rainer, and Daniel Pauly, eds. (2012). Species of Dermogenys in FishBase. June 2012 version.
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