Overview

Distribution

Historic Range:
Pacific Ocean_Admiralty Is. (Manus Is.)

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
DD
Data Deficient

Red List Criteria

Version
2.3

Year Assessed
1996
  • Needs updating

Assessor/s
Mollusc Specialist Group

Reviewer/s

Contributor/s

History
  • 1994
    Rare
    (Groombridge 1994)
  • 1990
    Rare
    (IUCN 1990)
  • 1988
    Rare
    (IUCN Conservation Monitoring Centre 1988)
  • 1986
    Rare
    (IUCN Conservation Monitoring Centre 1986)
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Source: IUCN

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Current Listing Status Summary

Status: Endangered
Date Listed: 06/02/1970
Lead Region: Foreign (Region 10) 
Where Listed: Entire


Population detail:

Population location: Entire
Listing status: E

For most current information and documents related to the conservation status and management of Papustyla pulcherrima , see its USFWS Species Profile

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Wikipedia

Emerald green snail

The emerald green snail, green tree snail, or Manus green tree snail, scientific name Papustyla pulcherrima, sometimes listed as Papuina pulcherrima, is a species of large, air-breathing tree snail, a terrestrial pulmonate gastropod mollusk in the family Camaenidae.

The shells of this species were in demand for making jewelry, and were popular with shell collectors and partly as a result of this, the species is now endangered.

Distribution and habitat[edit]

This species is endemic to Manus Island in Papua New Guinea. This snail lives in trees, and inhabits rain forest areas up to 112 meters above sea level.

Description[edit]

The shell of this species is a vivid green color, which is unusual in snails. The green color is however not within the solid, calcium carbonate part of the shell but instead it is a very thin protein layer known as the periostracum. Under the periostracum the shell is yellow.

Endangered[edit]

Overharvesting of the species for commercial purposes led to a decline in the population of this snail. Logging of the rain forest where this species lives is also a serious threat to its survival.[1]

The snail and its shell are protected under CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora)[2] and the species is listed in the IUCN Red List as a species on which data are deficient.[1]

Papustyla pulcherrima is the only foreign gastropod species that is listed as Federally Endangered in the United States since 2 June 1970.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Mollusc Specialist Group 1996. Papustyla pulcherrima. In: IUCN 2008. 2008 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 20 July 2013.
  2. ^ CITES species database. Accessed 20 July 2013
  3. ^ U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (Last updated 5 January 2010). Species Profile for Manus Island Tree snail (Papustyla pulcherrima)." U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service website. Accessed 6 January 2010.
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