Ecology

Associations

Animal / parasite / endoparasite
Anoplophrya endoparasitises intestine (esp just behind the crop) of Lumbricidae

Animal / parasite / endoparasite
Apolocystis endoparasitises seminal vessicle of Lumbricidae

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Animal / predator
Arthurdendyus triangulatus is predator of Lumbricidae

Animal / predator
Austroplana sanguinea is predator of Lumbricidae

Animal / parasite / endoparasite
larva of Bellardia endoparasitises Lumbricidae

Animal / dung saprobe
fruitbody of Conocybe dumetorum is saprobic in/on dung or excretions of old worm cast of Lumbricidae

Animal / parasite / endoparasite
Monocystis endoparasitises seminal vessicle of Lumbricidae

Animal / parasite / endoparasite
Nematocystis endoparasitises seminal vessicle of Lumbricidae

Animal / parasite / endoparasite
larva of Pollenia endoparasitises Lumbricidae

Animal / carrion / dead animal feeder
Reticulocephalis anamorph of Reticulocephalis clathroides feeds on dead dead Lumbricidae
Remarks: captive: in captivity, culture, or experimentally induced

Animal / parasite / endoparasite
4th stage larva of Rhabditis pellio endoparasitises coelom of Lumbricidae

Animal / parasite / endoparasite
Rhabdocystis endoparasitises seminal vessicle of Lumbricidae

Animal / parasite / endoparasite
Rhynchocystis endoparasitises seminal vessicle of Lumbricidae

Animal / dung/debris feeder
fruitbody of Sebacina epigaea feeds on dung/debris worm casts of Lumbricidae

Animal / parasite / endoparasite
larva of Toxocara canis endoparasitises tissue of Lumbricidae

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Known prey organisms

Lumbricidae (lumbricid (undet.)) preys on:
rotting wood
Pinus

Based on studies in:
USA: North Carolina (Forest, Plant substrate)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • H. E. Savely, 1939. Ecological relations of certain animals in dead pine and oak logs. Ecol. Monogr. 9:321-385, from pp. 335, 353-56, 377-85.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:6629
Specimens with Sequences:5651
Specimens with Barcodes:5149
Species:238
Species With Barcodes:224
Public Records:2272
Public Species:161
Public BINs:272
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

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Wikipedia

Lumbricidae

The Lumbricidae are a family of earthworms which includes most of the earthworm species well-known to Europeans. About 33 lumbricid species have become naturalized around the world,[1] but the bulk of the species are in the Holarctic region: from Canada (e.g. Bimastos lawrenceae on Vancouver Island) and the United States (e.g. Eisenoides carolinensis, Eisenoides lonnbergi and most Bimastos spp.) and throughout Eurasia to Japan (e.g. Eisenia japonica, E. koreana and Helodrilus hachiojii). An enigmatic species in Tasmania is Eophila eti. Currently, 670 valid species and subspecies in about 42 genera are recognized.[2]

Genera[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Contents of "Cosmopolitan Earthworms" 1st and 2nd Editions, Blakemore (2002, 2006)". VermEcology. 2008. Retrieved 2008-02-12. 
  2. ^ "A Series of Searchable Texts on Earthworm Biodiversity, Ecology and Systematics from Various Regions of the World". YNU, COE Chapter 10: A list of valid, invalid and synonymous names of Criodriloidea and Lumbricoidea (Annelida: Oligochaeta: Criodrilidae, Sparganophilidae, Ailoscolecidae, Hormogastridae, Lumbricidae, Lutodrilidae). 2007. Retrieved 2008-01-04. 
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Disclaimer

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