Evolution and Systematics

Functional Adaptations

Functional adaptation

Hunting in the dark: piranha
 

Eyes of piranhas can see in dark, murky waters because they can detect far-red light.

     
  "Thanks to far-red light, some fish can see even in water that appears black to us. The ferocious piranha, for example, swimming in the murky waters of the Amazon, perceives the water as dark red, a color that is visually penetrable, rather than black. The water looks red because the molecules of rotting vegetation in it absorb most wavelengths of visible light except far-red light, which is reflected back and can be seen by the piranha, allowing it to see the prey that it is hunting, apparently in the dark." (Shuker 2001:19)
  Learn more about this functional adaptation.
  • Shuker, KPN. 2001. The Hidden Powers of Animals: Uncovering the Secrets of Nature. London: Marshall Editions Ltd. 240 p.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:38Public Records:10
Specimens with Sequences:37Public Species:2
Specimens with Barcodes:37Public BINs:2
Species:2         
Species With Barcodes:2         
          
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Barcode data

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Pygocentrus

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Wikipedia

Pygocentrus

Pygocentrus is a genus of the piranha family Serrasalmidae. All are native to tropical South America. All the species are predatory, scavengers and form huge schools. The famous red-bellied piranha, Pygocentrus nattereri, is one of four species in the genus. The Chi-Cohala[spelling?] tribe uses the teeth to make tools and weapons.

Species[edit]

There are currently four recognized species in this genus:[1]

References[edit]

  • Fink, W. 1993. Revision of the piranha genus Pygocentrus (Teleostei, Characiformes). Copeia 3:665-687.
  • Machado-Allison, A. & W. Fink. 1996. Los peces caribes de Venezuela> diagnosis, claves, aspectos ecológicos y evolutivos. Universidad Central de Venezuela, CDCH, (Colección Monografías)Caracas, 149p. ISBN 980-00-0967-1
  1. ^ Froese, Rainer, and Daniel Pauly, eds. (2013). Species of Pygocentrus in FishBase. April 2013 version.
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