Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 67 specimens in 20 taxa.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 8 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0.005 - 2.5
  Temperature range (°C): 26.770 - 27.724
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.256 - 1.750
  Salinity (PPS): 35.887 - 36.481
  Oxygen (ml/l): 4.330 - 4.602
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.047 - 0.137
  Silicate (umol/l): 1.728 - 3.545

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 0.005 - 2.5

Temperature range (°C): 26.770 - 27.724

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.256 - 1.750

Salinity (PPS): 35.887 - 36.481

Oxygen (ml/l): 4.330 - 4.602

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.047 - 0.137

Silicate (umol/l): 1.728 - 3.545
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Associations

Known predators

Gambusia (nematodes, mosquito fish, least killifish) is prey of:
Testudines
Serpentes
Decapoda
Floridichthys carpio
Lophogobius cyprinoides

Based on studies in:
USA: Florida, South Florida (Swamp)
USA: Florida, Everglades (Estuarine)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • L. D. Harris and G. B. Bowman, Vertebrate predator subsystem. In: Grasslands, Systems Analysis and Man, A. I. Breymeyer and G. M. Van Dyne, Eds. (International Biological Programme Series, no. 19, Cambridge Univ. Press, Cambridge, England, 1980), pp. 591-
  • W. E. Odum and E. J. Heald, The detritus-based food web of an estuarine mangrove community, In Estuarine Research, Vol. 1, Chemistry, Biology and the Estuarine System, Academic Press, New York, pp. 265-286, from p. 281 (1975).
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© SPIRE project

Source: SPIRE

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Known prey organisms

Gambusia (nematodes, mosquito fish, least killifish) preys on:
Insecta
algae
phytoplankton
Nematoda
Crustacea
Polychaeta
Bivalvia
Actinopterygii
Cumacea

Based on studies in:
USA: Florida, South Florida (Swamp)
USA: Florida, Everglades (Estuarine)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • L. D. Harris and G. B. Bowman, Vertebrate predator subsystem. In: Grasslands, Systems Analysis and Man, A. I. Breymeyer and G. M. Van Dyne, Eds. (International Biological Programme Series, no. 19, Cambridge Univ. Press, Cambridge, England, 1980), pp. 591-
  • W. E. Odum and E. J. Heald, The detritus-based food web of an estuarine mangrove community, In Estuarine Research, Vol. 1, Chemistry, Biology and the Estuarine System, Academic Press, New York, pp. 265-286, from p. 281 (1975).
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© SPIRE project

Source: SPIRE

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:267Public Records:98
Specimens with Sequences:190Public Species:16
Specimens with Barcodes:186Public BINs:17
Species:21         
Species With Barcodes:21         
          
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Barcode data

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Gambusia

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Gambusia

Gambusia is a large genus of fish in family Poeciliidae (order Cyprinodontiformes). Gambusia contains over 40 species, most of which are principally found in freshwater habitats, though some species may also be found in brackish or saltwater habitats. The type species is the Cuban gambusia, G. punctata. The greatest species richness is in Mexico, Texas and the Greater Antilles, but there are also species elsewhere in eastern and southern United States, The Bahamas, Central America and Colombia. Gambusia species are often called topminnows or simply gambusias; they are also known as mosquitofish, which, however, refers more specifically to two species, G. affinis and G. holbrooki. These can be introduced into ponds to eat mosquito larvae.[1][2] As a consequence they have been introduced widely outside their native range, and sometimes become invasive, threatening the local species.[3] They are very important in aquarium trade, desired for small size, ease of breeding, and charming gracefulness. They are viviparous—they have live young.

Nine species are listed as Vulnerable in the IUCN Red List; one, the widemouth gambusia, G. eurystoma, is Critically Endangered; and two, the Amistad gambusia, G. amistadensis, and the San Marcos gambusia, G. georgei, are already extinct.

Species[edit]

There are currently 45 recognized species in this genus:[4][5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Gambusia: A Little Fish That Helps Solve Big Mosquito Problems". Alabama Vector Management Society. 24 December 2009. Retrieved 10 June 2011. [dead link]
  2. ^ Allen, Greg (10 June 2011). "Tropical Disease Buzzes Back Into U.S.". Morning Edition. NPR. Retrieved 10 June 2011. 
  3. ^ Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (2013). Gambusia affinis (Mosquito fish). Retrieved 27 February 2013
  4. ^ Froese, Rainer, and Daniel Pauly, eds. (2012). Species of Gambusia in FishBase. August 2012 version.
  5. ^ a b Langerhans, R. B., Gifford, M. E., Domínguez-Domínguez, O., García-Bedoya, D. & DeWitt, T.J. (2012): Gambusia quadruncus (Cyprinodontiformes: Poeciliidae): a new species of mosquitofish from east-central México. Journal of Fish Biology, DOI: 10.1111/j.1095-8649.2012.03397.x
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!