Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

 This large anemone, growing up to 30 cm across the tentacles, has a smooth featureless column and up to 200 long thick tentacles. The tentacles are arranged in concentric rings of 6, then 6, then 12 , then 24 tentacles and so on (hexamerous). Bolocera tuediae is dull pink to brown in colour.
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Biology: Nematocysts

More info
LocationImageCnidae TypeRange of
Lengths (m)
Range of
Widths (m)
nNState
Carlgren O., 1940
Actinopharynx
N/A basitrichs  42 - 53  x  4 -   /
N/A basitrichs  17 - 31  x  3.5 - 4  /
microbasic p-mastigophores  22 - 26  x  5 - 5.5  /
Column
N/A basitrichs  30 - 43  x  3 - 4  /
Filaments
N/A basitrichs  17 - 20  (24) x  2.5 -   /
N/A basitrichs  43 - 62  x (3.5)  4 -   /
N/A microbasic p-mastigophores  26 - 29  x  5 - 5.5  /
Tentacles
basitrichs  70 - 86  x  3.5 - 4  /
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Description

This large sea anemone has a smooth column not divided into regions. The tentacles are long and stout, graceful in full expansion, longitudinally fluted in partial contraction, with a slight but definite constriction around the base. Size up to 300mm across tentacles. Colour varies from pale whitish, pink or buff, to orange, occasionally with dark markings around the base of the tentacles. This large and distinctive anemone is capable of shedding its tentacles, pinching them off by muscular action, hence the groove at their bases. The reason for this is unknown; observations of this occurrence in nature would be welcomed. This species may be confused with Urticina eques, but the latter usually has a distinct pattern on the disc, its tentacles are arranged in multiples of 10 (6 in Bolocera) and there are tiny warts on the column.
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Distribution

Recorded from all coasts of Britain but rare in south. Recent records from divers are in Scottish sea lochs. Generally distributed throughout the north Atlantic, north to the Arctic Circle and east to north America.
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Laurentian Channel (bathyal zone)(=Honguedo Strait), Laurentian Channel (bathyal zone) to the northeast of Anticosti Island (=Jacques Cartier Strait), and the western slope of Newfoundland, including the southern part of the Strait of Belle Isle but excluding the upper 50 m in the area southwest of Newfoundland.
  • North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS)
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Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 165 specimens in 2 taxa.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 107 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 10 - 1624
  Temperature range (°C): 3.487 - 13.153
  Nitrate (umol/L): 3.688 - 29.152
  Salinity (PPS): 32.565 - 35.912
  Oxygen (ml/l): 1.492 - 6.590
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.524 - 2.179
  Silicate (umol/l): 2.945 - 33.142

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 10 - 1624

Temperature range (°C): 3.487 - 13.153

Nitrate (umol/L): 3.688 - 29.152

Salinity (PPS): 32.565 - 35.912

Oxygen (ml/l): 1.492 - 6.590

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.524 - 2.179

Silicate (umol/l): 2.945 - 33.142
 
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 This anemone is found sublittorally at depths from 20 m to at least 2000 m.
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Found in sheltered habitats attached to rocks, stones, shells, etc. From about 20m down to very deep water.
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shelf to abyssal
  • UNESCO-IOC Register of Marine Organisms
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bathyal of the Gulf and estuary
  • North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS)
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Wikipedia

Bolocera tuediae

Bolocera tuediae is one of the largest North Sea anemones. It can grow up to 300 millimetres (12 in) across the tentacles. It has been recorded from all coasts of Britain, but is more rare in the south. Recent records from divers are in Scottish sea lochs. It is generally distributed throughout the North Atlantic, north to the Arctic Circle and east to North America.

Characteristics[edit source | edit]

Its body is very smooth and is usually pink or red colored. Its tentacles are long, stout and graceful in full expansion. It is capable of shedding its tentacles, pinching off by muscular action. The body is often serves as protection for other animals, like the Deepsea King Crab (Lithodes maja).

Habitat[edit source | edit]

This anemone is found in sheltered habitats attached to rocks, stones, shells, corals, and any other hard surface object in the ocean. It can be found from about 20 metres (66 ft) to more than 2,000 metres (6,600 ft) deep.

References[edit source | edit]


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