Overview

Brief Summary

Fossil species

recent & fossil

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Ecology

Associations

Known predators

Vermetidae (vermetids) is prey of:
Opeatostoma
Thais melones
Actinopterygii

Based on studies in:
Pacific: Bay of Panama (Littoral, Rocky shore)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • B. A. Menge, J. Lubchenco, S. D. Gaines and L. R. Ashkenas, A test of the Menge-Sutherland model of community organization in a tropical rocky intertidal food web, Oecologia (Berlin) 71:75-89, from p. 85 (1986).
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Known prey organisms

Vermetidae (vermetids) preys on:
plankton
detritus

Based on studies in:
Pacific: Bay of Panama (Littoral, Rocky shore)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • B. A. Menge, J. Lubchenco, S. D. Gaines and L. R. Ashkenas, A test of the Menge-Sutherland model of community organization in a tropical rocky intertidal food web, Oecologia (Berlin) 71:75-89, from p. 85 (1986).
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Evolution and Systematics

Evolution

Classification

The position of the Vermetidae has been controversial. However, sperm ultrastructure (Healy, 1988) and molecular data (e.g., Colgan et al. 2000) clearly show that it belongs in the Littorinimorpha although placement in the Cerithioidea still persist (e.g. Bandel & Kowalke, 1997; Kowalke, 1998; Bandel & Kiel, 2000). Lydeard et al. (2002) found Campanile and Serpulorbis [= Thylacodes] formed a clade that was sister to the Cerithioidea but outgroup sampling in this analysis was limited.
  • Bouchet P. & Rocroi J.-P. (2005). Classification and nomenclator of gastropod families. Malacologia. 47(1-2): 1-397 ISBN 3-925919-72-4.
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Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records: 497
Specimens with Sequences: 492
Specimens with Barcodes: 458
Species: 21
Species With Barcodes: 15
Public Records: 458
Public Species: 15
Public BINs: 112
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Barcode data

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Wikipedia

Vermetidae

Vermetidae, common name the worm snails or worm shells, is a taxonomic family of small to medium-sized sea snails, marine gastropod molluscs in the clade Littorinimorpha.[1] The shells of species in the family Vermetidae are extremely irregular, and do not resemble the average snail shell, hence the common name "worm shells" or "worm snails".

These snails usually grow cemented onto a hard surface, or cemented together in colonies.

Shell description[edit]

These snails do not have typical regularly coiled gastropod shells; instead they have very irregular elongated tubular shells which are moulded to, and cemented to, a surface of attachment such as a rock or another shell and so on. In the adult the apertural part of the shell is usually free, with the opening directed upward. Some species have an operculum and some do not. Damaged sections of the shell can be sealed off by calcareous septa when necessary.

Some vermetids are solitary, whereas others live in colonies, partially cemented together. The shells of species within this family vary greatly and can sometimes be extremely challenging to identify.

Comparison with annelid worm tubes[edit]

The empty calcareous tubes of certain marine annelid tube worms, for example the Serpulidae, can sometimes be casually misidentified as empty vermetid shells, and vice versa. The difference is that vermetid shells are shiny inside and have 3 shell layers, whereas the annelid worm tubes are dull inside and have only 2 shell layers.

Taxonomy[edit]

2005 taxonomy[edit]

Vermetidae were recognized as the only family in the superfamily Vermetoidea in the taxonomy of Bouchet & Rocroi (2005) within the clade Littorinimorpha.

The following two subfamilies were recognized in the taxonomy of Bouchet & Rocroi (2005):[1]

Family Vermetidae Rafinesque, 1815

  • Subfamily Vermetinae Rafinesque, 1815
  • Subfamily Dendropomatinae Bandel & Kowalke, 1997

This classification of the Vermetoidea has been somewhat controversial. Studies, based on sperm ultrastructure,[2] and on molecular data[3] clearly place it within the clade Littorinimorpha. However, there are still a number of authors[4][5][6] that place it within the superfamily Cerithioidea. The genera Campanile and Serpulorbis from a clade that is sister to the Cerithioidea, as shown in a study by Lydeard et al. (2002).[7]

2006 taxonomy[edit]

Bandel (2006)[8] have established a new subfamily Laxispirinae and he have been recognized three subfamilies of Vermetidae:

Genera[edit]

Genera within the family Vermetidae include:

Vermetinae

† Laxispirinae

  • Laxispira Gabb, 1877 - Late Cretaceous, type genus of the subfamily[8]

Dendropomatinae

Subfamily ?

Genera brought into synonymy

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Bouchet P., Rocroi J.-P., Frýda J., Hausdorf B., Ponder W., Valdés Á. & Warén A. (2005). "Classification and nomenclator of gastropod families". Malacologia: International Journal of Malacology (Hackenheim, Germany: ConchBooks) 47 (1-2): 1–397. ISBN 3925919724. ISSN 0076-2997. 
  2. ^ J.M. Healy (1988). "Sperm morphology in Serpulorbis and Dendropoma and its relevance to the systematic position of the Vermetidae (Gastropoda)". Journal of Molluscan Studies 54: 295–308. doi:10.1093/mollus/54.3.295. 
  3. ^ D. Colgan, W.F. Ponder & P.E. Eggler (2000). "Gastropod evolutionary rates and phylogenetic relationships assessed using partial 28s rDNA and histone H3 sequences". Zoologica Scripta 29: 29–63. doi:10.1046/j.1463-6409.2000.00021.x. 
  4. ^ K. Bandel & T. Kowalke (1997). "Cretaceous Laxispira and a discussion on the monophyly of vermetids and turritellids (Caenogastropoda, Mollusca)". Geologica et Palaeontologica 31: 257–274. 
  5. ^ "Earliest known (Campanian- members of the Vermetidae, Provannidae and Litiopidae (Cerithioidea, Gastropoda) and a discussion on their possible relationships". Mitteilungen aus dem geologisch-Paläontologischen Institut, Universität Hamburg 84: 209–218. 2000. 
  6. ^ T. Kowalke (1998). "Bewertung protoconchmorphologischer Daten basaler Caenogastropoda (Cerithiimorpha und Littorinimorpha) hinsichtlich ihrer Systematik und Evolution von der Kreide bis rezent". Berliner Geowissenschaftliche Abhandlungen, ser; E (Palaeobiologie) 27: 1–121. 
  7. ^ C. Lydeard, W.E. Holznagel, M. Glaubrecht & W.F. Ponder (2002). "Molecular phylogeny of a circumglobal, diverse gastropod superfamily (Cerithioidea, Mollusca, Caenogastropoda) : pushing the deepest phylogenetic limits of mitochondrial LSU r DNA sequences". Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 22 (3): 399–406. doi:10.1006/mpev.2001.1072. 
  8. ^ a b c Bandel K. (2006). "Families of the Cerithioidea and related superfamilies (Palaeo-Caenogastropoda; Mollusca) from the Triassic to the Recent characterized by protoconch morphology - including the description of new taxa". Freiberger Forschungshefte C 511: 59-138. PDF.
  9. ^ Gofas, S. (2009). Vermetus Daudin, 1800. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=138652 on 2010-08-05
  10. ^ WoRMS (2009). Cerithiovermetus. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=394145 on 2010-08-05
  11. ^ WoRMS (2009). Dendropoma Mörch, 1861. In: Bouchet, P.; Gofas, S.; Rosenberg, G. (2009) World Marine Mollusca database. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=138649 on 2010-08-05
  12. ^ WoRMS (2010). Bivonia Gray, 1842. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=225183 on 2010-08-05
  13. ^ WoRMS (2009). Eualetes. Accessed through the World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=397074 on 2010-08-05
  14. ^ WoRMS (2009). Novastoa Finlay, 1926. Accessed through the World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=205769 on 2010-08-05
  15. ^ WoRMS (2009). Petaloconchus Lea, 1843. In: Bouchet, P.; Gofas, S.; Rosenberg, G. (2009) World Marine Mollusca database. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=138650 on 2010-08-05
  16. ^ Gofas, S. (2010). Serpulorbis Sassi, 1827. In: Bouchet, P.; Gofas, S.; Rosenberg, G. (2010) World Marine Mollusca database. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=138651 on 2010-08-05
  17. ^ "Spiroglyptus Daudin, 1800". ITIS, accessed 6 August 2010.
  18. ^ WoRMS (2009). Stephopoma Mörch, 1860. Accessed through the World Register of Marine Species at http://marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=224610 on 2010-08-05
  19. ^ WoRMS (2009). Thylaeodus. Accessed through the World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=146458 on 2010-08-05
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