Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 307 specimens in 7 taxa.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 180 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0 - 710
  Temperature range (°C): 6.257 - 29.336
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.099 - 39.739
  Salinity (PPS): 32.279 - 37.151
  Oxygen (ml/l): 0.416 - 5.662
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.055 - 2.927
  Silicate (umol/l): 0.677 - 46.771

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 0 - 710

Temperature range (°C): 6.257 - 29.336

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.099 - 39.739

Salinity (PPS): 32.279 - 37.151

Oxygen (ml/l): 0.416 - 5.662

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.055 - 2.927

Silicate (umol/l): 0.677 - 46.771
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:176
Specimens with Sequences:111
Specimens with Barcodes:110
Species:6
Species With Barcodes:6
Public Records:34
Public Species:5
Public BINs:4
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Barcode data

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Diodon

This article is about the fish. For the clipboard software, see Diodon (software).

Members of the family Diodontidae, species of the genus Diodon are usually known as porcupinefishes or balloonfishes.

Distinguishing features[edit]

Fish of the genus Diodon have;

  • two-rooted, moveable spines (actually modified scales) distributed over their bodies.
  • beak-like jaws, used to crush their hard-shelled prey (crustaceans and molluscs).[2]

They differ from the swelltoads and burrfishes (genus Cyclichthys and Chilomycterus), which have fixed, rigid spines.

Defense mechanisms[edit]

  • Like pufferfishes they can inflate themselves, making their spines stand perpendicular to the skin. When inflated they pose a major difficulty to their predators: a large diodon fully inflated can choke a shark to death. According to Charles Darwin in The Voyage Of the Beagle (1845), Darwin was told by a Doctor Allen of Forres, UK that the Diodon actually had been found "floating alive and distended, in the stomach of the shark" and had been known to chew its way out of shark bodies after being swallowed, causing the death of its attacker. [3]
  • They may be poisonous, through the accumulation of tetrodotoxin or ciguatera.[2]

Species[edit]

There are currently five recognized species in this genus:[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sepkoski, Jack (2002). "A compendium of fossil marine animal genera". Bulletins of American Paleontology 364: p.560. Retrieved 2007-12-25. 
  2. ^ a b Lieske, E. and Myers, R.F. (2004) Coral reef guide; Red Sea London, HarperCollins ISBN 0-00-715986-2
  3. ^ Darwin, Charles (1845). Journal of researches into the natural history and geology of the countries visited during the voyage of H.M.S. Beagle round the world, under the Command of Capt. Fitz Roy, R.N. 2d edition. London: John Murray. p. 14. 
  4. ^ Froese, Rainer, and Daniel Pauly, eds. (2012). Species of Diodon in FishBase. October 2012 version.
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!