Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:550
Specimens with Sequences:1471
Specimens with Barcodes:495
Species:108
Species With Barcodes:101
Public Records:405
Public Species:100
Public BINs:114
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Barcode data

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Genomic DNA is available from 5 specimens with morphological vouchers housed at Museum Victoria
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Wikipedia

Terebridae

The Terebridae, commonly referred to as auger shells or auger snails, is a group or family of small to large predatory marine gastropods.[3]

These gastropods have extremely high spired shells with numerous whorls, and the common name refers to the resemblance of their shells to rock drill-type drill bits.

There are about 313 known species worldwide.[2]

Taxonomy[edit]

This family consists of two following subfamilies (according to the taxonomy of the Gastropoda by Bouchet & Rocroi, 2005):

However, Terryn[2] states that the subfamily Pervicaciinae would historically include solely the * Duplicaria (and the * Pervicaria, now included in Euterebra). The other genera would belong to the subfamily Terebrinae. Since there is no clear division and currently no taxonomic need the two subfamilies are nowadays no longer accepted.[4][5]

Shell description[edit]

The shells of the sea snails in this family are typically shaped like slender augers or screws. In that respect they share certain shell characters with the family Turritellidae, the turret shells.

One characteristic that distinguishes Terebridae from Turritellidae is the short anterior canal or notch in the aperture of the shell. Terebridae shells also tend to have characteristically flattened versus convex whorls, and they often have one or two plaits on the columella.

Numerous species in this family are grouped under either the Terebra or the Hastula genus, and a minority of species are placed in four other genera.

Life habits[edit]

These snails are sand-dwelling carnivores which live in warmer waters. In most species, a venomous barb similar to that of the cone snails, (see Conidae), is used to stun and immobilize prey, which typically consists of various marine worms.

A grow of shells of the Atlantic or eastern auger, Terebra dislocata

Genera[edit]

Genera in the family Terebridae include:[2][6]



Genera brought into synonymy
  • Acus H. Adams & A. Adams, 1853 (synonym of Oxymeris)
  • Abretia H. Adams & A. Adams, 1853: synonym of Perirhoe Dall, 1908
  • Abretiella Bartsch, 1923: synonym of Perirhoe Dall, 1908
  • Acuminia Dall, 1908: synonym of Hastula H. Adams & A. Adams, 1853
  • Acus Gray, 1847: synonym of Oxymeris Dall, 1903
  • Brevimyurella Oyama, 1961: synonym of Strioterebrum Sacco, 1891
  • Decorihastula Oyama, 1961: synonym of Myurella Hinds, 1844
  • Dimidacus Iredale, 1929: synonym of Terebra Bruguière, 1789
  • Diplomeriza Dall, 1919: synonym of Duplicaria Dall, 1908
  • Egentelaria Rehder, 1980: synonym of Hastula H. Adams & A. Adams, 1853
  • Gradaterebra Cotton & Godfrey, 1932: synonym of Euterebra Cotton & Godfrey, 1932
  • Hastulina Oyama, 1961: synonym of Hastula H. Adams & A. Adams, 1853
  • Laeviacus Oyama, 1961: synonym of Pristiterebra Oyama, 1961
  • Myurellina Bartsch, 1923: synonym of Terebra Bruguière, 1789
  • Myurellisca Bartsch, 1923: synonym of Duplicaria Dall, 1908
  • Noditerebra Cossmann, 1896 †: synonym of Terebra Bruguière, 1789
  • Nototerebra Cotton, 1947: synonym of Oxymeris Dall, 1903
  • Panaterebra Olsson, 1967: synonym of Terebra Bruguière, 1789
  • Paraterebra Woodring, 1928: synonym of Terebra Bruguière, 1789
  • Partecosta Dance & Eames, 1966: synonym of Euterebra Cotton & Godfrey, 1932
  • Pervicacia Iredale, 1924: synonym of Duplicaria Dall, 1908
  • Punctoterebra Bartsch, 1923: synonym of Strioterebrum Sacco, 1891
  • Subula Schumacher, 1817: synonym of Terebra Bruguière, 1789
  • Terebrina Bartsch, 1923: synonym of Terebra Bruguière, 1789
  • Terebrum Montfort, 1810: synonym of Terebra Bruguière, 1789
  • Vertagus Link, 1807: synonym of Terebra Bruguière, 1789

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mörch O. A. L. (1852). Catalogus conchyliorum quae reliquit D. Alphonso d'Arguirra et Gadea Comes de Yoldi, (1): 74.
  2. ^ a b c d Terryn, Y. (2007): A Collectors Guide to Recent Terebridae (Mollusca: Neogastropoda). 57 pp., 65 color plts. ConchBooks & NaturalArt, Hackenheim & Gent, ISBN 978-3-939767-01-5.
  3. ^ a b Gofas, S. (2012). Terebridae. World Register of Marine Species [1] 2012-10-12
  4. ^ WoRMS (2010). Terebrinae. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=411816 on 2011-04-01
  5. ^ WoRMS (2010). Pervicaciinae. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=411817 on 2011-04-01
  6. ^ Gofas, S. (2010). Terebridae. In: Bouchet, P.; Gofas, S.; Rosenberg, G. (2010) World Marine Mollusca database. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=160424 on 2010-04-01
  • Bratcher T. & Cernohorsky W.O. (1987). Living terebras of the world. A monograph of the recent Terebridae of the world. American Malacologists, Melbourne, Florida & Burlington, Massachusetts. 240pp

Further reading[edit]

  • Terryn Y. & Holford M. (2008). "The Terebridae of Vanuatu, with a revision of the * Granuliterebra Oyama, 1961". Visaya Supplement 3 (Malacological Journal of Conchology, Inc., Cebu, Philippines).
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