Overview

Distribution

endemic to a single nation

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Type Information

Syntype for Thamnophis sirtalis semifasciatus
Catalog Number: USNM 8070
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Amphibians & Reptiles
Preparation: Ethanol
Locality: Aux Plaines (= Des Plaines), Cook, Illinois, United States, North America
  • Syntype: Cope, E. D. 1892. Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus. 14 (882): 662.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Amphibians & Reptiles

Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Syntype for Thamnophis sirtalis semifasciatus
Catalog Number: USNM 1051
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Amphibians & Reptiles
Preparation: Ethanol
Locality: No Further Locality Data, Wisconsin, United States, North America
  • Syntype: Cope, E. D. 1892. Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus. 14 (882): 662.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Amphibians & Reptiles

Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Syntype for Thamnophis sirtalis semifasciatus
Catalog Number: USNM 1018
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Amphibians & Reptiles
Preparation: Ethanol
Locality: Northfield, Cook, Illinois, United States, North America
  • Syntype: Cope, E. D. 1892. Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus. 14 (882): 662.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Amphibians & Reptiles

Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: TNR - Not Yet Ranked

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Chicago Garter Snake

The Chicago garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis semifasciatus) is a subspecies of the common garter snake native to the Chicago, USA, region. It was described by Edward Drinker Cope in 1892, and can be found in the vicinity of rural waterways in northeastern Illinois, such as Piscasaw Creek in Boone County and McHenry County, Illinois.[2]

Contents

Description

Identification

The Illinois Natural History Survey describes the Chicago garter snake as a medium-sized, up to 100 cm (39 in) in total length, including the tail), dark brown or black snake with a yellow or gray mid-back stripe, a yellow stripe on each side, and a gray-green belly with dark spots on the edges of most of the belly scales. The snake's head is usually without parietal light spots. Some specimens have red coloring between the side scales.[2]

One feature that distinguishes the Chicago garter snake from other garter snake subspecies, especially the eastern garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis sirtalis), is, in Thamnophis sirtalis semifasciatus, the snake's side stripe is broken, near the snake's head, into a dashed line by black crossbars.[2]

Habitat

The snake prefers forest and edge habitats near a body of water. It is a cold-tolerant snake that occasionally emerges from hibernation to bask on warm winter days. The snake emerges from hibernation upon the spring thaw (March or April), and typically mates immediately after. The females, like other garter snakes, give birth to a clutch of 15–80 live young; parturition is typically in July through early October. The newborn snakes are 15–20 cm (6–8 in) in total length.[2]

Its diet includes fish, amphibians, young birds, and invertebrates such as earthworms, slugs, and snails. The snake is often killed by human beings and by predatory vertebrates, especially hawks and owls.[2]

References

  1. ^ Boulenger, G.A. 1893. Catalogue of the Snakes in the British Museum (Natural History). Volume I., Containing the Families...Colubridæ Aglyphæ, part. Trustees of the British Museum (Natural History). London. xiii + 448 pp. + Plates I. - XXVIII. (Tropidonotus ordinatus Var. sirtalis, pp. 206-207.)
  2. ^ a b c d e "Thamnophis sirtalis - Common Garter Snake". Illinois Natural History Survey. http://www.inhs.illinois.edu/animals_plants/herps/species/th_sirtali.html. Retrieved 2011-02-08.

Further reading

  • Cope, E.D. 1892. A critical review of the characters and variations of the snakes of North America. Proc. U.S. Natl. Mus. 14: 589-694. (Eutænia sirtalis semifasciata, p. 662.)
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!