Overview

Comprehensive Description

Sebastes sp. ZBK

(Fig. 2)

A single juvenile rockfish was obtained from lobstermen by Mr. James Glass at Edinburgh and donated to us for description. It differs remarkably from the only known species at Tristan, Sebastes capensis (Gmelin) , by its rusty red colour without a trace of white blotches on the dorsum typical of the large subgenus Sebastomus Gill , and its lack of supraocular spines.

Rocha-Olivares et al. (1999) clarified the systematics of southern hemisphere Sebastes ZBK using mitochondrial DNA sequence variation. They concluded that S. capensis was widespread across the South Atlantic with an unsampled clade in the southeastern Pacific where it overlaps the range of S. oculatus . Both these species are clearly members of subgenus Sebastomus . Almost all juvenile specimens of S. capensis from Tristan known to date have been more orangish than our specimen, with the white blotches and with supraocular spines.

Mr John Hyde, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, California, has sequenced tissue samples of this specimen for the cytochrome b gene. He reports that out of the 1141 base pairs for the gene, 1138 match with 10 S. capensis from South Africa which he puts well within normal intraspecific variation in Sebastes ZBK and less than the difference between S. capensis and S. oculatus . Three unique nucleotide differences were found in the red specimen, suggesting along with the morphological differences, that it may represent an undescribed, cryptic species. However, Mr. Hyde reports that three nucleotide differences from one fish, with the small sample size of S. capensis , make it difficult to consider that our specimen represents a distinct species. Also, the nucleotide differences would not cause a change in the protein encoded by the gene. More specimens for confirmation are sought.

Dr. Paul Tyler, Darwin Project, U. K., sent the first author several underwater photographs of Sebastes capensis and Helicolenus mouchezi from Tristan taken during dives in late 2004 at depths of 15-25 m. One (Fig. 3) is of a red individual with poorly developed dorsal blotches and with small spots reminiscent of the northeastern Pacific S. constellatus Jordan and Gilbert . Thus, it appears that S. capensis at Tristan may exist as several morphotypes, possibly including the odd specimen in Fig. 2.

Counts: Vertebrae 8 + 17 = 25; D XIII, 14; A III, 6; P 18; C (branched rays) 12; gill rakers 8 + 1 + 17 + 3 pads; lateral line pores 38; pyloric caeca 9; vertical scale rows above lateral line 66; scales between lateral line and D origin 12. Head spines present: nasal, preocular, postocular, tympanic, parietal, supracleithral and cleithral. Head spines absent: supraocular, coronal and nuchal. Proportions in percent SL: head length 37.7; snout length 5.9; orbit diameter 11.7; interorbital width 5.1; lacrimal width 4.6; body depth 33.0; predorsal length 29.2; preanal length 69.0; prepelvic length 38.5; caudal peduncle depth 9.1; pectoral fin length 25.2; pelvic fin length 20.4; length 4th D spine 14.7; length 2nd A spine 18.8; spinous D base 35.2; rayed D base 22.7; A base 13.8. Both jaws and branchiostegal membranes naked. Interorbital concave. Symphyseal knob weak, ventral margin evenly rounded. No dentigerous premaxillary knobs. Body colour uniformly dark rusty red without white blotches, ventral part of abdomen whitish; fin membranes reddishorange except pectoral fin which is more red; irregular, black humeral spot present.

Material: SAIAB 74965 (male, 147 mm SL); Tristan da Cunha off Edinburgh; lobster trap; 50-70 m; 3- 6 July 2004 ; J. Glass.

  • M. E. Anderson, D. L. Stein, H. W. Detrich (2005): Additions to the ichthyofauna of the Tristan da Cunha Group, South Atlantic Ocean. Zootaxa 1072, 27-33: 30-32, URL:http://www.zoobank.org/urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:394228F5-C326-482F-876B-58BF0C84CA19
Public Domain

MagnoliaPress via Plazi

Source: Plazi.org

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Known from seamounts and knolls
  • Stocks, K. 2009. Seamounts Online: an online information system for seamount biology. Version 2009-1. World Wide Web electronic publication.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© WoRMS for SMEBD

Source: World Register of Marine Species

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Depth range based on 52467 specimens in 93 taxa.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 37872 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): -9 - 80000
  Temperature range (°C): -1.960 - 15.663
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.796 - 44.379
  Salinity (PPS): 30.660 - 36.121
  Oxygen (ml/l): 0.303 - 8.006
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.262 - 3.485
  Silicate (umol/l): 1.488 - 197.214

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): -9 - 80000

Temperature range (°C): -1.960 - 15.663

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.796 - 44.379

Salinity (PPS): 30.660 - 36.121

Oxygen (ml/l): 0.303 - 8.006

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.262 - 3.485

Silicate (umol/l): 1.488 - 197.214
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records: 2025
Specimens with Sequences: 1806
Specimens with Barcodes: 1777
Species: 77
Species With Barcodes: 73
Public Records: 1515
Public Species: 68
Public BINs: 35
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Barcode data

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Sebastes

Sebastes is a genus of fish in the family Sebastidae (though some include this in Scorpaenidae), most of which have the common name of rockfish. A few are called ocean perch, sea perch or redfish instead. Most of the Sebastes species live in the north Pacific, although two (S. capensis and S. oculatus) live in the south Pacific/Atlantic and four (S. fasciatus, S. mentella, S. norvegicus and S. viviparus) live in the north Atlantic. The coast off South California is the area of highest rockfish diversity, with 56 species living in the Southern California Bight.

The fossil record of rockfish goes back to the Miocene, from California and Japan (although fossil otoliths from Belgium, "Sebastes" weileri, may push the record back as far as the Oligocene).

Rockfish are an important sport and commercial fish, and many species have been overfished. As a result seasons are tightly controlled in many areas. Sebastes are sometimes fraudulently substituted for the more expensive red snapper (L. campechanus).[3]

Ecology[edit]

Rockfish range from the intertidal zone to almost 3,000 metres (9,800 ft) deep, usually living benthically on various substrates, often (as the name suggests) around rock outcrops. Some rockfish species are very long-lived, amongst the longest-living fish on earth, with several species known to surpass 100 years of age, and a maximum reported age of 205 years for S. aleutianus.[4]

Ecotoxicology, radioecology[edit]

Like all carnivores, these fish can bioaccumulate some pollutants or radionuclides such as cesium. Highly radioactive rockfish have been caught in a port near Fukushima city, Japan, not far from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, nearly two years after the nuclear disaster (ex: 107000 Bq/kg[5] (2013-02-12) ; 116000 Bq/kg[5] (2013-02-13) and 132000Bq/kg[5] (2013-02-13), respectively 1070, 1160 and 1320 more than Japanese standard time (as updated on April 1, 2012[5]).

Species[edit]

There are currently 107 recognized extant species in this genus:[6]

A rockfish in the Monterey Bay Aquarium.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sepkoski, Jack (2002). "A compendium of fossil marine animal genera". Bulletins of American Paleontology 364: p.560. Retrieved 2007-12-25. 
  2. ^ "Scorpaeniformes". Paleobiology Database. Retrieved November 15, 2012. 
  3. ^ "Regulatory Fish Encyclopedia". U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Retrieved 21 August 2013. 
  4. ^ Cailliet, G.M., Andrews, A.H., Burton, E.J., Watters, D.L., Kline, D.E., Ferry-Graham, L.A. (2001). "Age determination and validation studies of marine fishes: do deep-dwellers live longer?". Exp. Gerontol. 36 (4–6): 739–764. doi:10.1016/S0531-5565(00)00239-4. PMID 11295512. 
  5. ^ a b c d TEPCO (2013), [Nuclide Analysis Results of Fish and Shellfish (The Ocean Area Within 20km Radius of Fukushima Daiichi NPS <1/13>] 2013-02-28 (accessed 2013-03-19)
  6. ^ Froese, Rainer, and Daniel Pauly, eds. (2012). Species of Sebastes in FishBase. December 2012 version.
  • Milton S. Love, Mary Yoklavich, Lyman K. Thorsteinson, (2002), The Rockfishes of the Northeast Pacific, University of California Press
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!