Physical Description

Diagnostic Description

Description

Colonies are flat (foliaceous or encrusting), massive or branching. Massive colonies are spherical or hemispherical when small and helmet- or dome-shaped when large, and are commonly over 5 m in diameter. Corallites are small, immersed, with calices less than 2 mm in diameter and filled with septa. Polyps are usually extended only at night (Veron, 1986). Corallites often very small (<2 mm across), but colonies very large. Colonies domed; can reach up to 8 m in height (Richmond, 1997).
  • Veron, J.E.N. (1986). Corals of Australia and the Indo-Pacific. Angus & Robertson Publishers, London.
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Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Ecology

Habitat

Known from seamounts and knolls
  • Stocks, K. 2009. Seamounts Online: an online information system for seamount biology. Version 2009-1. World Wide Web electronic publication.
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Depth range based on 33744 specimens in 164 taxa.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 24415 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): -0.5 - 109.375
  Temperature range (°C): 19.819 - 29.290
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.003 - 8.028
  Salinity (PPS): 32.279 - 37.286
  Oxygen (ml/l): 3.986 - 5.213
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.020 - 0.566
  Silicate (umol/l): 0.523 - 6.986

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): -0.5 - 109.375

Temperature range (°C): 19.819 - 29.290

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.003 - 8.028

Salinity (PPS): 32.279 - 37.286

Oxygen (ml/l): 3.986 - 5.213

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.020 - 0.566

Silicate (umol/l): 0.523 - 6.986
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:78Public Records:62
Specimens with Sequences:65Public Species:20
Specimens with Barcodes:56Public BINs:3
Species:24         
Species With Barcodes:21         
          
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Barcode data

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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Porites

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Wikipedia

Porites

Porites is a genus of stony coral; they are SPS (Small Polyp Stony) corals. They are characterised by a finger-like morphology. Members of this genus have widely spaced calices, a well-developed wall reticulum and are bilaterally symmetrical. Porites, particularly Porites lutea, often form microatolls.[3] Corals of the genus Porites also often serve as hosts for Christmas tree worms (Spirobranchus giganteus).

Aquarium trade[edit]

Specimens of Porites are sometimes available for purchase in the aquarium trade. Most Porites that are collected have Christmas tree worms (Spirobranchus giganteus) that bore into the coral, serving as additional aesthetic livestock. These particular Porites specimens are called "christmas tree worm rocks" or "christmas tree worm coral". However, due to the strict water quality, lighting and dietary requirements, keeping Porites in captivity is very difficult.

Small colony of Porites porites, French Bay, San Salvador Island, Bahamas

Paleoclimatology[edit]

Porites corals have been shown to be accurate and precise recorders of past marine surface conditions.[4] Measurements of the oxygen isotopic composition of the aragonitic skeleton of coral specimens indicate the sea-surface temperature conditions and the oxygen isotopic composition of the seawater at the time of growth.[5] The oxygen isotopic composition of seawater can indicate the precipitation/evaporation balance because oxygen atoms of the more abundant mass 16 will preferentially evaporate before the more rare mass 18 oxygen. The relationship between temperature, precipitation, and the oxygen isotopic composition of Porites corals is important for reconstructing past climates, and associated large-scale patterns such as the El-Nino Southern Oscillation, the Intertropical Convergence Zone, and the mean state of the climate system.

Species[edit]

References[edit]


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