Physical Description

Diagnostic Description

Description

Colonies are massive, laminar, encrusting or foliaceous. Corallites are immersed or conical with short, numerous, neatly spaced short septa. Columellae are deep-seated and compact. Corallite walls are slightly porous and the coenosteum and walls have few elaborations. Polyps are extended only at night. (Veron, 1986 <57>)
  • Veron, J.E.N. (1986). Corals of Australia and the Indo-Pacific. Angus & Robertson Publishers, London.
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Source: World Register of Marine Species

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Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 2891 specimens in 19 taxa.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 2697 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0 - 87.5
  Temperature range (°C): 22.214 - 28.796
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.038 - 2.040
  Salinity (PPS): 33.070 - 35.637
  Oxygen (ml/l): 4.495 - 4.969
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.062 - 0.435
  Silicate (umol/l): 0.523 - 4.896

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 0 - 87.5

Temperature range (°C): 22.214 - 28.796

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.038 - 2.040

Salinity (PPS): 33.070 - 35.637

Oxygen (ml/l): 4.495 - 4.969

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.062 - 0.435

Silicate (umol/l): 0.523 - 4.896
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:6Public Records:2
Specimens with Sequences:3Public Species:2
Specimens with Barcodes:3Public BINs:1
Species:4         
Species With Barcodes:2         
          
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Astreopora

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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Astreopora

Astreopora is a genus of stony corals in the Acroporidae family. Members of the genus are commonly known as star corals and there are about thirteen species.

Contents

Description

Members of this genus mostly form dome-shaped or rounded heads but sometimes have leaflike extensions, be encrusting or form plates, vases and branches.[1] They are much larger than members of the genus Montipora. They have a wide range of colours including yellow, brown, green, pink and blue but the most common are whitish-blue. The corallites are distinct and separate, sometimes raised on cones and sometimes depressed, up to four millimetres across and round in cross-section. The skeleton is porous with the coenosteum having a net-like appearance. The coral appears rough-textured because of tiny spines that cover the surface between the corallites. The septa are poorly developed giving corals of this genus the appearance of being filled with holes.[2]

Distribution

Members of this genus occur in the Red Sea, the Indian Ocean and the western Pacific. They are widespread but not particularly common and are a reef building species.[2] They are found in a range of environments including shallow or muddy waters and deeper areas of the reef where plating forms are most common.[1] In shallow water they are inconspicuous and are never dominant. They may form heads of up to two metres in diameter and in deeper waters they may be much more common.[3]

Ecology

The porous skeleton of these corals provide a home to a variety of polychaete worms that weaken the calcium carbonate structure by tunnelling into it.[1]

Several species of coral-inhabiting barnacles are associated with Astreopora. In fact, Hiroa stubbingsi and two species of Cionophora seem to occur nowhere else. In the case of H. stubbingsi, which has a primitive wall and a relatively unspecialised operculum, this may be because it is not equipped to occupy other corals, but the Cionophora species are smaller and it is an enigma why they are not found elsewhere.[4]

Species

Known species include: [5]

References

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