Overview

Distribution

Chongqing, Gansu, Hebei, Heilongjiang, Hubei, Jiangsu, Jilin, Liaoning, Shaanxi, Shanxi, Sichuan, Yunnan [Japan, Korea, Russia].
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Climbing shrubs, large, deciduous. Branchlets glabrous, lenticels inconspicuous to subconspicuous when young, conspicuous when old; pith brown, lamellate. Petiole yellowish white to reddish brown, 2.5-5 cm, sparsely pubescent to glabrous; leaf blade broadly ovate to oblong-ovate or oblong-obovate, 6-15 × 5-10 cm, membranous to thinly papery, abaxially glabrous to subglabrous, sometimes barbate at vein axils, adaxially sparsely strigillose, midvein and lateral veins distinct and raised abaxially, slender, inconspicuous adaxially, lateral veins 6-8 pairs, veinlets reticulate, inconspicuous on both surfaces to subconspicuous abaxially, base cordate, occasionally rounded to truncate, equal or oblique, margin serrate to biserrate, apex acute to abruptly acuminate. Inflorescences cymose, 1-3-flowered; peduncles 0.8-1.2 cm, very slender; pedicels 4-10 mm, glabrous to yellowish brown tomentose; bracts linear, minute. Flowers pink or white. Sepals 5, ovate to oblong-ovate, 4-6 mm, glabrous, margin ciliate, apex acute. Petals 5 or 6, obovate, 6-10 mm. Filaments 3-6 mm; anthers yellow, oblong, 2-2.5 mm, sagittate at base. Ovary globose, ca. 3 mm, glabrous. Fruit pale orange when mature, ovoid, 2-2.5 cm, glabrous, lenticels absent; sepals caducous. Seeds ca. 2 mm. Fl. Apr-Jul, fr. Sep-Oct. 2n = 58*, 116*.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Prunus kolomikta Maximowicz & Ruprecht, Bull. Cl. Phys.-Math. Acad. Imp. Sci. Saint-Pétersbourg 15: 129. 1856; Actinidia gagnepainii Nakai; A. kolomikta var. gagnepainii (Nakai) H. L. Li; A. leptophylla C. Y. Wu; A. maloides H. L. Li; A. maloides f. cordata C. F. Liang; A. tetramera Maximowicz var. maloides (H. L. Li) C. Y. Wu; Kalomikta mandshurica Regel, nom. illeg. superfl.; Trochostigma kolomikta (Maximowicz & Ruprecht) Ruprecht.
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Ecology

Habitat

Mountain mixed forests in open places, also widely cultivated; 1600-2900 m.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Actinidia kolomikta

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Actinidia kolomikta

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 3
Specimens with Barcodes: 12
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Wikipedia

Actinidia kolomikta

Actinidia kolomikta (Japanese: Miyamamatatabi 深山木天蓼, ミヤママタタビ) (Rupr. et Maxim.) is a species of flowering plant in the family Actinidiaceae, native to temperate mixed forests of the Russian Far East, Korea, Japan and China (Eastern Asiatic Region).[1]

Description[edit]

The plant is a very long-lived, deciduous woody scrambling vine and creeper, which ultimately grows to 8–10 m (26–33 ft). It is the hardiest species in the genus Actinidia, at least down to about −40 °C (−40 °F) in winter, albeit somewhat susceptible to late spring frosts.

Cultivation[edit]

Actinidia kolomikta is an ornamental plant for gardens and a houseplant. The plant was collected by Charles Maries in Sapporo, on the northern Japanese island of Hokkaido, in 1878, and sent to his patrons, Veitch Nurseries, who introduced it into Western horticulture.[2]

Actinidia kolomikta is cultivated in cold temperate regions as an ornamental plant, largely for the striking random variegation in pink and white of some its leaves but also because of the relatively small (2-5 g or 0.07- 0.18 ounces) kiwifruit-like delicious berries it produces. There are a number of named cultivars bred for the latter purpose in Russia and Poland, though it takes years for a plant to start yielding, and because A. kolomikta is dioecious a male pollenizer plant is required for the wild vines and most of the cultivars.

This plant has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.[3]

Pets[edit]

The plant is attractive to cats, which find it more attractive than catnip or valerian and can severely damage the vine. An early propagator in Boston found all his pots of the newly introduced plant bitten to stubs in his greenhouse, before his cat was discovered to be the culprit.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "''Flora of China'': Actinidia kolomikta". Efloras.org. Retrieved 2013-11-18. 
  2. ^ Alice M. Coats, Garden Shrubs and Their History (1964) 1992, s.v. "Actinidia".
  3. ^ "Actinidia kolomikta". Royal Horticultural Society. Retrieved 22 July 2013. 
  4. ^ Coats 1992.
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Notes

Comments

Actinidia kolomikta var. shihmienensis C. Y. Chang (J. Sichuan Univ., Nat. Sci. Ed. 3: 78. 1976), described from Sichuan, could not be treated here because no material was seen by the authors.
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