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Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Gansu, Hebei, Henan, Jiangsu, Nei Mongol, Shaanxi, Shandong, Shanxi, Sichuan, Xinjiang, Yunnan, Zhejiang [Russia (Siberia); N Africa, C and SW Asia, Europe].
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Herbs perennial, stoloniferous. Roots much branched, usually with fusiform, tubers. Stolons 20–100 cm, sparsely pilose or glabrescent, with adventitious roots at nodes. Radical leaves 7–12 cm including petiole; stipules brown, membranous, abaxially glabrescent; petiole sparsely pilose, appressed sericeous, or glabrescent; leaf blade pedately 5-foliolate, or 3-foliolate; leaflets shortly petiolulate or subsessile, obovate to obovate-oblong, abaxially pilose or appressed sericeous, rarely glabrescent, adaxially subglabrous, base cuneate, margin acutely or obtusely serrate or lobed to parted, sometimes entire, apex obtuse; stolon leaves resembling radical ones; stipules green, ovate-oblong or ovate-lanceolate, herbaceous, margin entire, rarely 1- or 2-serrate, apex acute or acuminate. Flowers solitary, axillary or opposite leaves, 1.5–2.2 cm in diam.; pedicel 6–9 mm, pilose. Sepals ovate-lanceolate, apex acute; epicalyx segments oblong-elliptic or elliptic-lanceolate, nearly equaling sepals, markedly enlarged in fruit, abaxially pilose, apex obtuse or acute. Petals yellow, broadly obovate, slightly longer than sepals, apex markedly emarginate. Style subterminal, thin at base; stigma dilated. Achenes yellow-brown, ovoid, markedly rugose. Fl. and fr. Apr–Sep.
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Ecology

Habitat

Forest margins, thickets by streams, meadows on mountain slopes, ditch banks, damp field margins; 300--3500 m.
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Associations

Foodplant / spot causer
crowded, epiphyllous, often scattered over whole leaf acervulus of Marssonina coelomycetous anamorph of Diplocarpon earlianum causes spots on live, small, yellow leaf of Potentilla reptans
Remarks: season: 7-10

Foodplant / miner
larva of Fenella nigrita mines leaf of Potentilla reptans

Foodplant / parasite
epiphyllous, uredinoid aecium of Fromme parasitises live leaf of Potentilla reptans
Other: unusual host/prey

Foodplant / open feeder
nocturnal larva of Macrophya annulata grazes on leaf of Potentilla reptans
Other: sole host/prey

Foodplant / spot causer
hypophyllous colony of Ramularia anamorph of Mycosphaerella fragariae causes spots on live leaf of Potentilla reptans

Foodplant / parasite
sporangium of Peronospora potentillae parasitises live Potentilla reptans

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / parasite
sporangium of Peronospora potentillae-reptantis parasitises live Potentilla reptans
Other: major host/prey

Foodplant / parasite
telium of Phragmidium fragariae parasitises live Potentilla reptans
Other: unusual host/prey

Foodplant / parasite
Podosphaera aphanis parasitises live Potentilla reptans

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Potentilla reptans

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Potentilla reptans

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 9
Specimens with Barcodes: 9
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Wikipedia

Potentilla reptans

Potentilla reptans, known as the creeping cinquefoil, European cinquefoil or creeping tormentil, is a plant in the Rosaceae family.

It is a creeping perennial plant native to Eurasia and Northern Africa and naturalized elsewhere.[1] Its trailing stems root at the nodes. Leaves are borne on long stalks. It blooms in June - August with yellow flowers (about 2 cm in diameter) that have 5 heart-shaped petals. It is quite common. Could be easily confused with silverweed. The butterfly known as the Grizzled Skipper is known to favour this plant which is often found growing in crushed masonry in the South of England.

References[edit]


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