Overview

Comprehensive Description

Biology

Adults inhabit lakes and rivers. Juveniles move into the sea and return to rivers after several months. This species has several types differentiated according to shape, coloration, and life history. Each type is isolated by habitat in the same stream.
  • Masuda, H., K. Amaoka, C. Araga, T. Uyeno and T. Yoshino 1984 The fishes of the Japanese Archipelago. Vol. 1. Tokai University Press, Tokyo, Japan. 437 p. (text). (Ref. 559)
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Distribution

Range Description

R. n. formosanus is found in China and in northern and northeastern Taiwan. R. n. nagoyae is found in China, Taiwan, and Honsu, Kyushu, the Ryukyu Islands of Japan.
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Asia: river basin of the seas of Japan, Okhotsk, the Pacific coasts of Japan,Hokkaido, Ryukyu, Taiwan, rivers of Korea, continental China and the Philippines (Ref. 26334); Viet Nam (Ref. 89724). Introduced to the USA (Washington, Columbia and Portland, Oregon) (Ref. 92840).
  • Reshetnikov, Y.S., N.G. Bogutskaya, E.D. Vasil'eva, E.A. Dorofeeva, A.M. Naseka, O.A. Popova, K.A. Savvaitova, V.G. Sideleva and L.I. Sokolov 1997 An annotated check-list of the freshwater fishes of Russia. J. Ichthyol. 37(9):687-736. (Ref. 26334)
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Western Pacific: China, Japan, Korea, Philipines and Russia; established or reported from localized areas in U.S.A.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Dorsal spines (total): 7; Dorsal soft rays (total): 8 - 9; Analspines: 1; Analsoft rays: 8 - 9
  • Reshetnikov, Y.S. 2003 Atlas of Russian freshwater fishes, Vol. 2. Moscow Nauka. (Ref. 50519)
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Size

Maximum size: 100 mm TL
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Max. size

10.0 cm TL (male/unsexed; (Ref. 559))
  • Masuda, H., K. Amaoka, C. Araga, T. Uyeno and T. Yoshino 1984 The fishes of the Japanese Archipelago. Vol. 1. Tokai University Press, Tokyo, Japan. 437 p. (text). (Ref. 559)
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Type Information

Type for Rhinogobius sowerbyi
Catalog Number: USNM 76734
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Fishes
Collector(s): A. Sowerby
Locality: Yalu R., China, China, Asia
  • Type:
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Ecology

Habitat

Amur River Demersal Habitat

This taxon is one of a number of demersal species in the Amur River system. Demersal river fish are found at the river bottom, feeding on benthos and zooplankton

The persistence of mercury contamination in Amur River bottom sediments is a major issue, arising from historic cinnabar mining in the basin and poor waste management practises, especially in the communist Soviet era, where industrial development was placed ahead of sound conservation practises.

The largest native demersal fish species in the Amur River is the 560 centimeter (cm) long kaluga (Huso dauricus); demersal biota are those that inhabit the bottom of a surface water body. Another large demersal fish found in the Amur is the 300 cm Amur sturgeon (Acipenser schrenckii), a taxon which is endemic to the Amur basin.

Other demersal endemic fish species (all in the concubitae family) of the Amur Basin are Iksookimia longicorpa, I. koreensis, I. hugowolfeldi, Cobitis melanoleuca melanoleuca and the Puan spine loach (Iksookimia pumila).

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Columbia River Demersal Habitat

This taxon is one of a number of demersal species in the Columbia River system. Demersal river fish are found at the river bottom, feeding on benthos and zooplankton. The Columbia River is the largest North American watercourse by volume that discharges to the Pacific Ocean. With headwaters at Columbia Lake, in Canadian British Columbia, the course of the river has a length of approximately 2000 kilometers and a drainage basin that includes most of the land area of Washington, Oregon and Idaho as well as parts of four other U.S. states and two Canadian provinces.

The Columbia River Basin of northwestern North America is an important habitat for Acipenser transmontanus. The Columbia River is the largest North American watercourse by volume that discharges to the Pacific Ocean. With headwaters at Columbia Lake, in Canadian British Columbia, the course of the river has a length of approximately 2000 kilometers and a drainage basin that includes most of the land area of Washington, Oregon and Idaho as well as parts of four other U.S. states and two Canadian provinces.

The hydrology and aquatic habitat of the Columbia River basin has been adversely altered by numerous large dams. There are over 250 reservoirs and around 150 hydroelectric projects in the basin, including 18 mainstem dams on the Columbia and its main tributary, the Snake River.

Water quality in the Columbia River has deteriorated over the last century, due to agricultural runoff and logging practices, as well as water diversions that tend to concentrate pollutants in the reduced water volume. For example nitrate levels in the Columbia generally tripled in the period from the mid 1960s to the mid 1980s, increasing from a typical level of one to three milligrams per liter. Considerable loading of herbicides and pesticides also has occurred over the last 70 years, chiefly due to agricultural land conversion and emphasis upon maximizing crop yields.

Heavy metal concentrations in sediment and in fish tissue had become an issue in the latter half of the twentieth century; however, considerable progress has been made beginning in the 1980s with implementation of provisions of the U.S.Clean Water Act, involving attention to smelter and paper mill discharges along the Columbia.

Some large demersal fish species occurring in the Columbia Basin are the 610 centimeter (cm) white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus), the 76 cm Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata); the 55 cm Brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebolosus); the 61 cm largescale sucker (Catostomus macrocheilus); the 64 cm longnose sucker (Catostomus catostomus catostomus); and the 65 cm Utah sucker (Catostomus ardens).

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Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
R. nagoyae is a benthopelagic and amphidromous species.

Systems
  • Freshwater
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Environment

demersal; amphidromous (Ref. 51243); freshwater; brackish; marine; pH range: 7.0; dH range: 20
  • Riede, K. 2004 Global register of migratory species - from global to regional scales. Final Report of the R&D-Projekt 808 05 081. Federal Agency for Nature Conservation, Bonn, Germany. 329 p. (Ref. 51243)
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Depth range based on 1 specimen in 1 taxon.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 2 - 2
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Migration

Amphidromous. Refers to fishes that regularly migrate between freshwater and the sea (in both directions), but not for the purpose of breeding, as in anadromous and catadromous species. Sub-division of diadromous. Migrations should be cyclical and predictable and cover more than 100 km.Characteristic elements in amphidromy are: reproduction in fresh water, passage to sea by newly hatched larvae, a period of feeding and growing at sea usually a few months long, return to fresh water of well-grown juveniles, a further period of feeding and growing in fresh water, followed by reproduction there (Ref. 82692).
  • Riede, K. 2004 Global register of migratory species - from global to regional scales. Final Report of the R&D-Projekt 808 05 081. Federal Agency for Nature Conservation, Bonn, Germany. 329 p. (Ref. 51243)
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Trophic Strategy

Inhabits lakes and rivers. Juveniles move into the sea and return to rivers after several months. This species has several types differentiated according to shape, coloration, and life history. Each type is isolated by habitat in the same stream (Ref. 559). Landlocked species and also have an amphidromous life history, spending portions of their lives in both fresh and marine waters (Ref. 58910).
  • Masuda, H., K. Amaoka, C. Araga, T. Uyeno and T. Yoshino 1984 The fishes of the Japanese Archipelago. Vol. 1. Tokai University Press, Tokyo, Japan. 437 p. (text). (Ref. 559)
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Rhinogobius brunneus

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


No available public DNA sequences.

Download FASTA File
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Rhinogobius brunneus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 16
Specimens with Barcodes: 16
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
DD
Data Deficient

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2009

Assessor/s
Devi, R. & Boguskaya, N.

Reviewer/s
Collen, B., Darwall, W., Ram, M. & Smith, K. (SRLI Freshwater Fish Evaluation Workshop)

Contributor/s

Justification
R. nagoyae formosanus has been assessed as Data Deficient due to a lack of information regarding this species' distribution, population trends, or the direct threats to this species, however potential threats to the species do exist within its range.
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Population

Population
Population information is lacking for this species and needs to be studied.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
There are a number of potential threats to R. nagoyae including pollution and hydrological projects such as dams and water diversion projects, however it is not known whether these pose a direct threat to the species.
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Data deficient (DD)
  • IUCN 2006 2006 IUCN red list of threatened species. www.iucnredlist.org. Downloaded July 2006.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
It is not known if there are any conservation measures in place or needed.
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