Overview

Comprehensive Description

Biology

Inhabits coastal and sheltered reef flats in small groups and schools in oceanic locations (Ref. 48637). Feeds on benthic algae (Ref. 37792).
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Distribution

Range Description

Naso elegans is found from the Red Sea south to Durban, eastwards to Bali, Indonesia. It occurs in southern Oman but not the Gulf of Oman or Persian Gulf, and not reported from India.
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Indian Ocean: Red Sea south to Durban, South Africa and east through the islands of the western Indian Ocean to southwestern Indonesia, at least to Bali. Not reported from the Gulf of Oman, Persian Gulf, or India. Previously considered the Indian Ocean color variant of Naso lituratus.
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Red Sea, Indian Ocean: East Africa and Natal (South Africa), Seychelles, Madagascar and western Mascarenes east to western Indonesia, excluding the northern Indian Ocean.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Dorsal spines (total): 6; Dorsal soft rays (total): 26 - 30; Analspines: 2; Analsoft rays: 27 - 30
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Size

Max. size

45.0 cm SL (male/unsexed; (Ref. 37792))
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Diagnostic Description

Dorsal fin yellow with a blue line at base and a black band above this; anal and pelvic fins dark brown; dorsal and anal fins with a narrow blue margin and black submarginal line; caudal fin yellowish with black upper and lower margins and a submarginal black band posteriorly (Ref. 37792). Caudal fin emarginate with adult males having trailing filaments from each corner (Ref. 37792).
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
Naso elegans is classified as a browser on macroscopic algae (J.H. Choat pers. obs. in Green and Bellwood 2009). It achieves a maximum size of 360 mm (TL) in four years. The maximum age recorded is 17 years. It is much faster growing than N. lituratus in many locations it was found (J.H. Choat pers comm. 2010).

The sexes are separate and there is evidence of sexual dimorphism in the caudal knives which are relatively larger and longer filaments in males (J.H. Choat pers. comm. 2010).

Systems
  • Marine
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Environment

reef-associated; marine; depth range 5 - ? m (Ref. 48637)
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Trophic Strategy

Feeds on benthic algae (Ref. 37792).
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Naso elegans

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 2 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.  Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.  See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

ACAGCCTTA---AGCTTACTCATTCGGGCAGAACTAAGCCAACCAGGCGCCCTCCTCGGAGAT---GACCAAATCTATAATGTAATTGTTACAGCACATGCTTTCGTAATAATTTTCTTTATAGTAATGCCAATTATAATTGGAGGGTTTGGAAACTGACTAATCCCACTAATG---ATCGGGGCCCCAGATATGGCATTTCCCCGAATGAACAACATGAGCTTCTGACTACTTCCTCCCTCTTTCCTTCTCCTTCTTGCATCATCTGGAGTTGAAGCTGGGGCCGGAACCGGATGAACAGTCTATCCCCCTCTAGCTGGTAACCTAGCACACGCAGGGGCTTCCGTTGATCTA---ACTATCTTCTCCCTTCATCTGGCAGGGATTTCCTCAATTCTAGGGGCAATTAATTTTATCACAACTATCATTAACATGAAACCTCCTGCTATTTCTCAGTACCAAACCCCTCTATTCGTCTGAGCTGTATTAATCACGGCAGTACTGCTCCTTCTTTCTCTTCCAGTCCTTGCTGCT
-- end --

Download FASTA File
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Naso elegans

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 2
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
Choat, J.H., McIlwain, J., Abesamis, R., Clements, K.D., Myers, R., Nanola, C., Rocha, L.A., Russell, B. & Stockwell, B.

Reviewer/s
Edgar, G. & Kulbicki, M.

Contributor/s

Justification
Naso elegans is widespread in the Red Sea and Indian Ocean as far east as Bali including all intervening island groups. It achieves high abundances in Cocos and the central Red Sea and is moderately common in Madagascar. It is relatively rare elsewhere in its range. It is not specifically targeted in any fishery except in western Thailand. There is no evidence of declines from harvesting. It occurs in numerous marine protected areas in parts of its distribution. It is therefore listed as Least Concern.
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Population

Population
Naso elegans is moderately common in northwest Madagascar (Allen 2005). In Duba, Saudi Arabia, density was recorded at 7.5 ind/1,000 m2. It is reasonably abundant in the Red Sea and appears in the Jedda markets. It is relatively rare elsewhere in the Indian Ocean; moving further east in Christmas Island, abundance drops to 2 ind/1,000 m2 (J. McIlwain pers. comm. 2010). In Cocos, it is the most abundant reef dwelling Naso with a mean abundance of 8 ind./1,000 m2. It is less abundant in the Seychelles (J.H. Choat pers. comm. 2010).

In the Nabq Managed Resource Protected Area, South Sinai, Egyptian Red Sea, mean abundances of this species showed differences at various depths and between no-take zones (NTZ) and take zones (TZ). The greater abundance of the Acanthuridae in the fished area than in the NTZ across 1, 3 and 10 m depths, can be attributed to a result of reduced predation or competition (Ashworth and Ormond 2005).


Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
There are no major threats known for this species.

Surgeonfishes show varying degrees of habitat preference and utilization of coral reef habitats, with some species spending the majority of their life stages on coral reef while others primarily utilize seagrass beds, mangroves, algal beds, and /or rocky reefs. The majority of surgeonfishes are exclusively found on coral reef habitat, and of these, approximately 80% are experiencing a greater than 30% loss of coral reef area and degradation of coral reef habitat quality across their distributions. However, more research is needed to understand the long-term effects of coral reef habitat loss and degradation on these species' populations. Widespread coral reef loss and declining habitat conditions are particularly worrying for species that recruit into areas with live coral cover, especially as studies have shown that protection of pristine habitats facilitate the persistence of adult populations in species that have spatially separated adult and juvenile habitats (Comeros-Raynal et al. 2012).
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Least Concern (LC)
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There are no species-specific conservation measures in place for this species. However, its distribution overlaps several marine protected areas within its range.
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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Importance

fisheries: commercial
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Wikipedia

Naso elegans

Naso elegans is a tropical fish found in coral reefs in the Indian Ocean.[1] It is commonly known as the Elegant unicornfish, Indian orange-spine unicorn, Orange-spine unicorn, and Smoothheaded unicornfish.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Naso elegans at www.fishbase.org.
  2. ^ Common names for Naso elegans at www.fishbase.org.
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