Overview

Comprehensive Description

Biology

Benthic and free swimming (Ref. 92840). A neotenic, pelagic species inhabiting inshore and estuarine waters, over sand, mud and eel-grass (Ref. 4343). Adults feed on zooplankton, especially copepods, cirripede larvae and mysids (Ref. 4343). They spawn in summer in empty bivalve shells (Ref. 35388). Probably migrate to deeper water to spawn during summer (Ref. 57814). Adults die after breeding (Ref. 4696) which does not qualify as a manifestation of semelparity but abbreviate iteroparity according to a recent study (Ref. 81039). Eggs are pear-shaped (Ref. 4696).
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Distribution

Atlantic Ocean: Trondheim to Morocco. Also known from the Mediterranean including Black Sea and the Azov Sea (Ref. 57814).
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Western Baltic Sea, North Sea, Mediterranean Sea, Black Sea, Eastern North Atlantic: Norway to Morocco.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Dorsal spines (total): 4 - 6; Dorsal soft rays (total): 113; Analspines: 1; Analsoft rays: 11 - 15
  • Whitehead, P.J.P., M.-L. Bauchot, J.-C. Hureau, J. Nielsen and E. Tortonese (eds.) 1986 Fishes of the North-eastern Atlantic and the Mediterranean. UNESCO, Paris. Vols. I-III:1473 p. (Ref. 232)
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Size

Maximum size: 60 mm TL
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Max. size

7.9 cm TL (male/unsexed; (Ref. 26260)); max. reported age: 1 years (Ref. 232)
  • Arruda, L.M., J.N. Azevedo and A.I. Neto 1993 Abundance, age-structure and growth, and reproduction of gobies (Pisces: Gobiidae) in the Ria de Aviero Lagoon (Portugal). Estuar. Coastal Shelf Sci. 37:509-523. (Ref. 26260)
  • Whitehead, P.J.P., M.-L. Bauchot, J.-C. Hureau, J. Nielsen and E. Tortonese (eds.) 1986 Fishes of the North-eastern Atlantic and the Mediterranean. UNESCO, Paris. Vols. I-III:1473 p. (Ref. 232)
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Diagnostic Description

Transparent body, more or less reddish, with chromatophores along bases of median fins and on head. Vertebrae 26-28 (Ref. 232). Males with longer dorsal and anal fins than females (Ref. 35388).
  • Whitehead, P.J.P., M.-L. Bauchot, J.-C. Hureau, J. Nielsen and E. Tortonese (eds.) 1986 Fishes of the North-eastern Atlantic and the Mediterranean. UNESCO, Paris. Vols. I-III:1473 p. (Ref. 232)
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Ecology

Habitat

Environment

pelagic-neritic; oceanodromous (Ref. 51243); brackish; marine; depth range 0 - 97 m (Ref. 57814), usually 5 - 80 m (Ref. 57814)
  • Iglesias, M. and B. Morales-Nin 2001 Life cycle of the pelagic goby Aphia minuta (Pisces: Gobiidae). Sci. Mar. 65(3):183-192. (Ref. 57814)
  • Riede, K. 2004 Global register of migratory species - from global to regional scales. Final Report of the R&D-Projekt 808 05 081. Federal Agency for Nature Conservation, Bonn, Germany. 329 p. (Ref. 51243)
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Depth range based on 159 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 36 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 9.62 - 182
  Temperature range (°C): 6.695 - 10.582
  Nitrate (umol/L): 2.055 - 10.140
  Salinity (PPS): 33.631 - 35.239
  Oxygen (ml/l): 5.823 - 6.354
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.387 - 0.763
  Silicate (umol/l): 2.391 - 5.880

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 9.62 - 182

Temperature range (°C): 6.695 - 10.582

Nitrate (umol/L): 2.055 - 10.140

Salinity (PPS): 33.631 - 35.239

Oxygen (ml/l): 5.823 - 6.354

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.387 - 0.763

Silicate (umol/l): 2.391 - 5.880
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Depth: 0 - 80m.
Recorded at 80 meters.

Habitat: demersal.
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Migration

Oceanodromous. Migrating within oceans typically between spawning and different feeding areas, as tunas do. Migrations should be cyclical and predictable and cover more than 100 km.
  • Riede, K. 2004 Global register of migratory species - from global to regional scales. Final Report of the R&D-Projekt 808 05 081. Federal Agency for Nature Conservation, Bonn, Germany. 329 p. (Ref. 51243)
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Trophic Strategy

Occurs inshore, over sand, mud, eel-grass, etc., from the surface to 70-80 m (Ref. 4696).
  • Miller, P.J. 1986 Gobiidae. p. 1019-1085. In P.J.P. Whitehead, M.-L. Bauchot, J.-C. Hureau, J. Nielsen and E. Tortonese (eds.) Fishes of the North-eastern Atlantic and the Mediterranean. Volume 3. UNESCO, Paris. (Ref. 4696)
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Life History and Behavior

Life Cycle

Single spawner, all oocytes in the ovaries grow at a similar rate (Ref. 57814). However, a recent study showed that this species breeds at least twice during its short lifespan with batches of oocytes at different vittelogenic stages in the ovary (Ref. 81039). Reproduction is of the abbreviate iteroparous type with more than one spawning per reproductive season (in spring and summer in older females, in summer and autumn in the yougner ones) (Ref. 81039).
  • Miller, P.J. 1986 Gobiidae. p. 1019-1085. In P.J.P. Whitehead, M.-L. Bauchot, J.-C. Hureau, J. Nielsen and E. Tortonese (eds.) Fishes of the North-eastern Atlantic and the Mediterranean. Volume 3. UNESCO, Paris. (Ref. 4696)
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Aphia minuta

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 6
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Threats

Not Evaluated
  • IUCN 2006 2006 IUCN red list of threatened species. www.iucnredlist.org. Downloaded July 2006.
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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Importance

fisheries: commercial
  • Iglesias, M. and B. Morales-Nin 2001 Life cycle of the pelagic goby Aphia minuta (Pisces: Gobiidae). Sci. Mar. 65(3):183-192. (Ref. 57814)
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Wikipedia

Transparent goby

Aphia minuta, the Transparent goby, is a species of the goby native to the northeastern Atlantic Ocean where it can be found from Trondheim, Norway to Morocco. It is also found in the Mediterranean, Black Sea and the Sea of Azov. It is a pelagic species, inhabiting inshore waters and estuaries. It can be found at depths of from the surface to 97 metres (318 ft), though it is usually found at 5 to 80 metres (16 to 262 ft), over sandy and muddy bottoms and also in eel grass beds. This species can reach a length of 7.9 centimetres (3.1 in) TL. It is an important species to local commercial fisheries. It is currently the only known member of its genus.[1]

Gastronomy[edit]

This fish is appreciated in Spain as part of the Andalusian, Catalonian and Valencian cuisines.[2] In Andalusia, where they are called chanquetes it is traditionally served deep-fried, with fried eggs and roasted or fried pepper.[3] Due to its rarity and high prize, it is being commercially replaced by some species of Chinese noodlefishes, locally called chanquete chino (Chinese chanquete), Neosalanx tangkahkeii and Protosalanx hyalocranius.[4]

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