Overview

Comprehensive Description

Biology

Inhabits rocky and gravel bed pools in streams (Ref. 12045). Found in mountain rapids (Ref. 41236).
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Distribution

Asia: China. Known only from the upper Min-Jiang (Yangtze River basin, China) (Ref. 86867).
  • Zhou, W., X. Li and A.W. Thomson 2011 Two new species of the Glyptosternine catfish genus Euchiloglanis (Teleostei: Sisoridae) from southwest China with redescriptions of E. davidi and E. kishinouyei. Zootaxa 2871:1-18. (Ref. 86867)
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Nepal and eastern Himalayas and China.
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India, Nepal, Tibet and China.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Dorsal spines (total): 1; Dorsal soft rays (total): 5; Anal spines: 1; Analsoft rays: 4 - 5
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Size

Max. size

19.3 cm NG (male/unsexed; (Ref. 45661))
  • Chu, X. and T. Mo 1999 Sisoridae. p. 114-181. In X.-L. Chu, B.-S. Cheng and D.-Y. Dai (Eds). Faunica Sinica. Osteichthyes. Siluriformes. Science Press, Beijing. i-vii + 1-230. (Ref. 45661)
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Maximum size: 126 mm ---
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Diagnostic Description

Euchiloglanis kishinouyei differs from E. longibarbatus by having a pointed maxillary barbel, not elongated as a thread, with the tip reaching only to the gill opening (vs. maxillary barbel elongated as a thread, with tip reaching posteriorly beyond gill opening. Euchiloglanis kishinouyei differs from E. davidi, E. longibarbatus and E. longus by lacking indentations in premaxillary tooth band (vs. with indentations). It differs from E. davidi by having the length of the pectoral fin being equal to 75.5–89.6% (vs. 90.5–117.1%) of distance between insertions of pectoral and pelvic fins and further differs from E. davidi and E. longus by having the distance between insertion of pelvic-fin and origin of anus being equal to 81.5–97.5% (vs. 100.0–125.0 and 108.9–140.6% respectively) of distance between insertions of pectoral and pelvic fins. Euchiloglanis kishinouyei differs from E. dorsoarcus and E. phongthoensis by having the anus located midway between the pelvic-fin insertion and the anal-fin origin (vs. the distance from the anus to pelvic-fin insertion equal to about 50% of the distance from the anus to the anal-fin origin) (Ref. 86867).
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Ecology

Habitat

Yangtze River Demersal Habitat

This taxon is one of a number of demersal species in the Yangtze River system. Demersal river fish are found at the river bottom, feeding on benthos and zooplankton.

The upper Yangtze basin consists chiefly of Paleozoic limestone and terrigenous sedimentary rock, with some granitic material. The most downstream element of the upper Yangtze basin is often termed the Sichuan Basin; here the Yangtze cuts through Triassic and Permian material before entering the Three Gorges. The Three Gorges area is a stretch of the Yangtze that runs approximately 660 kilometers, terminating at the site of the Three Gorges Dam. Prior to construction of the dam, the Three Gorges area was a site of exceptional natural beauty; after dam construction the gorge areas were filled with approximately 100 meters in depth of Yangtze water, and considerable amounts of the watershed were graded.

The lower Yangtze basin consists of anabranching river structures and Pleistocene coastal terraces. Prior to development of the Three Gorges Dam, the Yangtze Delta was replenished with a copious sediment load reaching the river mouth; however, the dam has now severely limited the natural flow and deposition of sediment to the delta region. Consequently, the integrity of the delta is been compromised, with scouring exceeding deposition, and the very stability of the delta is endangered.

Lower and middle basins of the Yangtze carry heavy pollutant loads. In the lower Yangtze basin nitrate levels are high, measuring at about 1000 tons per day at Datong; these levels accrue from high applications of chemical fertilizer applied and also considerable loadings of untreated sewage due to the large human population of the basin, with correspondingly little infrastructure for sewage treatment.

Heavy metal concentrations are also high in the lower Yangtze, with measurements of dissolved lead at 0.078 microgram/liter; cadmium (0.024 microgram/liter), chromium (0.57 microgram/liter), copper (1.9 microgram/liter), and nickel (0.50 microgram/liter). Levels of dissolved arsenic have been measured at 3.3 microgram/liter) and zinc at 1.5 microgram/liter), both notably higher by factors of 5.5 and 2.5 respectively than other typical large world rivers. In Yangtze River suspended sediment, arsenic comprises 31 microgram/gram, lead comprises 83 microgram/gram, and nickel comprises 52 micrograms/gram of sediment content

There are several large native demersal fish found in the Yangtze River, chiefly the 250 centimeter (cm) long endangered Yangtze sturgeon (Acipenser dabryanus), the 120 cm Chinese sturgeon (Acipenser sinensis), the 200 cm Giant mottled eel (Anguilla marmorata), the 122 cm black carp (Mylopharyngodon piceus), the 300 cm Chinese paddlefish (Psephurus gladius), and the 100 cm Silurus meridionalis. Furthermore, there are a few exceptionally large native benthopelagic fishes found in the Yangtze, namely, the 105 cm Silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix), the 200 cm Wuchang bream (Megalobrama amblycephala), the 200 cm yellowcheek (Elopichthys bambusa), the 145 cm common carp (Cyprinus carpio carpio), the 122 cm Mongolian redfin (Chanodichthys mongolicus), the 102 cm predatory carp (Chanodichthys erythropterus) and the 100 cm snakehead (Channa argus argus).. The demersal fish Silurus meridionalis also is found as a Yangtze River endemic species.

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Environment

demersal; freshwater
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Trophic Strategy

Euchiloglanis davidi has been collected from medium sized rivers with stony or rock substrate. Euchiloglanis davidi is found in rapid flow and creeps along the substrate. Dissecting their intestine indicates that they feed mainly on aquatic insects and their larvae. According to villagers, adults spawn in apertures of the river bottom in May to June and the eggs are viscous (Ref. 86867).
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Conservation

Threats

Not Evaluated
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Wikipedia

Euchiloglanis kishinouyei

Euchiloglanis kishinouyei is a species of sisorid catfish native to Asia. Despite Sauvage describing this species as Chimarrichthys davidi in 1874, that name has been suppressed in favor of E. kishinouyei.[1]

Distribution[edit]

E. kishinouyei inhabits the Yangtze drainage, China. It has also been reported from the Brahmaputra drainage in India and the Ganges drainage in Nepal.[2] It is also listed as originating from Chinijiang, Sichuan; eastern Tibet; and Jinshajiang located at the upper Yangtze River basin.[3]

Description[edit]

E. kishinouyei is diagnosed by an interrupted post-labial groove, gill openings not extending to the underside, homodont dentition, pointed teeth in both jaws, tooth patches in upper jaw joined into crescent-shaped band, and 12–14 branched pectoral fin rays.[2] This fish species has a depressed head with a broadly rounded snout. The body is elongate, and it is flattened on the underside to the pelvic fins. The eyes are small, dorsally located, and subcutaneous (under the skin). The lips are thick, fleshy, and papillated, and a post-labial groove behind the lips is broadly interrupted at the middle. The gill openings are narrow, not extending below the pectoral fin base. The paired fins are plaited to form an adhesive apparatus.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2012). "Euchiloglanis kishinouyei" in FishBase. February 2012 version.
  2. ^ a b c Thomson, Alfred W.; Page, Lawrence M. (2006). "Genera of the Asian Catfish Families Sisoridae and Erethistidae (Teleostei: Siluriformes)" (PDF). Zootaxa 1345: 1–96. 
  3. ^ Ferraris, Carl J., Jr. (2007). "Checklist of catfishes, recent and fossil (Osteichthyes: Siluriformes), and catalogue of siluriform primary types" (PDF). Zootaxa 1418: 1–628. 


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