Overview

Comprehensive Description

Biology

Common around semi-protected inshore reefs with rich soft and hard coral growth, occasional patches of silt bottom. Very aggressive toward its own species, unless paired. Feeds mainly on sponges and tunicates (Ref. 30573). Minimum depth reported taken from Ref. 9710.
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Distribution

Range Description

This species occurs in the western Indian Ocean, where it ranges from the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden, south to the island of Zanzibar (Tanzania) (Allen 1980, G.R. Allen pers. comm. 2006). It has been recorded between 3-30 m in depth.
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Gulf of Aden (northwestern Indian Ocean) and Red Sea.
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Western Indian Ocean: Red Sea and Gulf of Aden, south to Zanzibar.
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Physical Description

Size

Maximum size: 400 mm TL
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Max. size

40.0 cm TL (male/unsexed; (Ref. 4858))
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Diagnostic Description

Description

Common around semi-protected inshore reefs with rich soft and hard coral growth, occasional patches of silt bottom. Very aggressive toward its own species, unless paired.
  • Anon. (1996). FishBase 96 [CD-ROM]. ICLARM: Los Baños, Philippines. 1 cd-rom pp.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species is usually found along protected shallow shoreline reefs with a rich growth of hard and soft corals, often mixed with occasional areas of silty substrate. It is a solitary, relatively shy species, that is not easy to approach (G.R. Allen pers. comm. 2006). Usually observed near large crevices or caves on the reef, and seldom venture away from these refuges (Allen 1980). It feeds mainly on sponges and tunicates (G.R. Allen pers. comm. 2006).

Systems
  • Marine
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Depth: 3 - 30m.
From 3 to 30 meters.

Habitat: reef-associated. Arabian angelfish. Adults dark blue to black with iridescent blue scales on forward part of body. Broad bright yellow vertical band across centre of body. Caudal fin yellow with light blue margin on trailing edge. Occurs in shallow coral rich reefs in 3 to 15 metres. Ranges from Red Sea and Gulf of Aden south to Zanzibar.
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Environment

reef-associated; non-migratory; marine; depth range 3 - 30 m (Ref. 30573)
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Depth range based on 6 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 2 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 3 - 15
  Temperature range (°C): 28.593 - 28.720
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.862 - 0.999
  Salinity (PPS): 37.566 - 37.646
  Oxygen (ml/l): 4.163 - 4.314
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.277 - 0.294
  Silicate (umol/l): 3.015 - 4.140

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 3 - 15

Temperature range (°C): 28.593 - 28.720

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.862 - 0.999

Salinity (PPS): 37.566 - 37.646

Oxygen (ml/l): 4.163 - 4.314

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.277 - 0.294

Silicate (umol/l): 3.015 - 4.140
 
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Trophic Strategy

Common around semi-protected inshore reefs with rich soft and hard coral growth, occasional patches of silt bottom. Very aggressive toward its own species, unless paired. Feeds mainly on sponges and tunicates (Ref. 30573).
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2010

Assessor/s
Pyle, R., Rocha, L.A. & Craig, M.T.

Reviewer/s
Elfes, C., Polidoro, B., Livingstone, S. & Carpenter, K.E.

Contributor/s

Justification
A common species with a relatively wide range and no apparent major threats. It is listed as Least Concern.
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Population

Population
It is generally common with stable populations.

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Major Threats

There appear to be no major threats to this species. Collection for the aquarium trade is limited to a few locations and does not seem to represent a global threat.

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Least Concern (LC)
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions

There are no species-specific conservation measures in place. It is present within some marine protected areas.

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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Importance

aquarium: commercial
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Wikipedia

Pomacanthus asfur

The Arabian angelfish (Pomacanthus asfur) is a fish well known for its use in saltwater aquariums, even though it tends to be a shyer specimen compared to the other, sometimes aggressive, angelfish.[1][2]

Description[edit]

The Arabian angelfish grows to a maximum length of 40 centimetres (16 in). The adult is generally dark greyish-black with a broad, crescent-shaped sash of yellow and a yellow tail. The dorsal fin has 12 spines and 19–20 soft rays and is elongated into filaments which trail behind the fish as it swims. The anal fin is also extended by filaments and has 3 spines and 18 to 20 soft rays. The pectoral fins have 17 to 18 rays. The juveniles have an altogether different appearance. They have a base colour of steely blue with a number of vertical, meandering stripes of white and pale blue.[3]

Distribution and habitat[edit]

The Arabian angelfish is found along the eastern coasts of Africa at depths up to 15 metres (49 ft). Its range extends from the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden to Zanzibar. It can be found also in the Persian Gulf. There are unconfirmed sightings of this species off the coast of Florida.[3] Its habitat includes sheltered coastal reefs with hard and soft corals, rocky reefs, crevices and the mouths of caves. It is timid which makes it difficult to observe.[3]

Biology[edit]

The Arabian angelfish feeds predominately on tunicates and sponges. The eggs are laid singly on the seabed.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Arabian Angelfish (Animal-World Pet and Animal Information)". Retrieved 15 September 2008. 
  2. ^ "Asfur Angelfish (Pet Education)". Retrieved 15 September 2008. 
  3. ^ a b c Pomacanthus asfur, Forsskål 1775: Arabian angelfish Retrieved 27 February 2012.


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