Articles on this page are available in 1 other language: Dutch (1) (learn more)

Overview

Brief Summary

Ticks are gruesome parasites that suck blood. They don't distinguish much between hosts: dogs, cats, people and other mammals. Ticks carry the infamous Lyme disease. They can let themselves fall out of trees and bushes but the greatest chance of contact is walking through high grass and wild flowers. The most important months to watch out for ticks are from April through October. Strange enough, they seem to be less present in nature areas where cattle roam. A tick usually visits three different hosts during its lifetime. Between two meals, they can go for months without food. Ticks are not only found in woods, but also in the dunes.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Copyright Ecomare

Source: Ecomare

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

There are many genera and species of ticks in the families Ixodidae (hard ticks) that are of public health importance. Some representative genera, and diseases they are known vectors for, include: Amblyomma (tularemia, ehrlichiosis, Rocky Mountain spotted fever [RMSF], boutonneuse fever); Dermacentor (RMSF, Colorado tick fever, tularemia, Siberian tick typhus, and Central European tick-borne encephalitis, as well as being an agent of tick paralysis); Hyalomma (Siberian tick typhus, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever); Ixodes (Lyme disease, babesiosis , human granulocytic ehrlichiosis, Russian spring-summer encephalitis); and Rhipicephalus (RMSF and boutonneuse fever).

Members of the family Ixodidae undergo either one-host, two-host or three-host life cycles. During the one-host life cycle, ticks remain on the same host for the larval, nymphal and adult stages, only leaving the host prior to laying eggs. During the two-host life cycle, the tick molts from larva to nymph on the first host, but will leave the host between the nymphal and adult stages. The second host may be the same individual as the first host, the same species, or even a second species. Most ticks of public health importance undergo the three-host life cycle, whereby the tick leaves the host after the larval and nymphal stages. The three hosts are not always the same species, but may be the same species, or even the same individual, depending on host availability for the tick.

(Centers for Disease Control Parasites and Health website)

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Shapiro, Leo

Source: EOL Rapid Response Team

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records: 2572
Specimens with Sequences: 1847
Specimens with Barcodes: 1663
Species: 251
Species With Barcodes: 137
Public Records: 729
Public Species: 83
Public BINs: 106
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Barcode data

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Ixodidae

The Ixodidae are a family of ticks containing the hard ticks.

Contents

Description

They are distinguished from the other main family of ticks, the soft ticks (Argasidae) by the presence of a scutum or hard shield.[1] In both the nymph and the adult, a prominent capitulum (head) projects forwards from the animal's body; in the Argasidae, conversely, the capitulum is concealed beneath the body.

Classification

Of the 702 species in 14 genera,[2] some are of considerable economic importance as vectors of diseases caused by bacteria such as Rickettsia and Borrelia.[1]

The family contains these genera:[2]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b D. H. Molyneux (1993). "Vectors". In Francis E. G. Cox. Modern parasitology: a textbook of parasitology (2nd ed.). Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 53–74. ISBN 978-0-632-02585-5. 
  2. ^ a b Alberto A. Guglielmone, Richard G. Robbing, Dmitry A. Apanaskevich, Trevor N. Petney, Agustín Estrada-Peña, Ivan G. Horak, Renfu Shao & Stephen C. Barker (2010). "The Argasidae, Ixodidae and Nuttalliellidae (Acari: Ixodida) of the world: a list of valid species names" (PDF). Zootaxa 2528: 1–28. 
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!