Overview

Comprehensive Description

Biology

Occurs usually in clear water over gravel in springs and spring-fed creeks.
  • Robins, C.R., R.M. Bailey, C.E. Bond, J.R. Brooker, E.A. Lachner, R.N. Lea and W.B. Scott 1991 Common and scientific names of fishes from the United States and Canada. Am. Fish. Soc. Spec. Pub. (20):183 p. (Ref. 3814)
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Distribution

endemic to a single state or province

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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Global Range: (5000-20,000 square km (about 2000-8000 square miles)) Range includes the Nueces River drainage, Edwards Plateau, Texas (Page and Burr 2011). MtDNA data (Richardson and Gold 1995) indicate that C. lepida occurs in the Frio and Sabinal rivers (Nueces River system) and that an undescribed species occurs in the Nueces River proper.

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Range Description

This species' range includes the Nueces River drainage, Edwards Plateau, Texas (Page and Burr 2011). MtDNA data (Richardson and Gold 1995) indicate that Cyprinella lepida occurs in the Frio and Sabinal rivers (Nueces River system) and that an undescribed species occurs in the Nueces River proper.
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North America: Edwards Plateau in Texas, USA in the upper Guadalupe and Nueces River drainages.
  • Page, L.M. and B.M. Burr 1991 A field guide to freshwater fishes of North America north of Mexico. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston. 432 p. (Ref. 5723)
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Texas, U.S.A.
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Physical Description

Size

Length: 6 cm

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Maximum size: 75 mm TL
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Max. size

7.5 cm TL (male/unsexed; (Ref. 5723))
  • Page, L.M. and B.M. Burr 1991 A field guide to freshwater fishes of North America north of Mexico. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston. 432 p. (Ref. 5723)
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Type Information

Syntype for Cyprinella lepida
Catalog Number: USNM 126
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Fishes
Preparation: Dry Osteological Specimen
Collector(s): C. Kennerly
Locality: Rio Frio, Texas., Uvalde County, Texas, United States, North America
  • Syntype:
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat Type: Freshwater

Comments: Habitat includes clear, cool, springs and spring-fed headwater creeks (Mayden 1989), usually over gravel (Page and Burr 2011).

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Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
Habitat includes clear, cool, springs and spring-fed headwater creeks (Mayden 1989), usually over gravel (Page and Burr 2011).

Systems
  • Freshwater
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Environment

benthopelagic; freshwater
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Migration

Non-Migrant: Yes. At least some populations of this species do not make significant seasonal migrations. Juvenile dispersal is not considered a migration.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 1 - 5

Comments: This species is represented by a small number of occurrences; apparently it occurs in only two rivers (Frio and Sabinal).

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N1 - Critically Imperiled

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G1 - Critically Imperiled

Reasons: Small range in the spring-fed Frio and Sabinal rivers in central Texas; abundance has declined appreciably over the past two decades; threatened by habitat alteration.

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IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
EN
Endangered

Red List Criteria
B2ab(iii)

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
NatureServe

Reviewer/s
Smith, K. & Darwall, W.R.T.

Contributor/s

Justification
This species is listed as Endangered because the area of occupancy is less than 500 sq km, the species occurs in fewer than 5 locations, and habitat quality may be declining.
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Global Short Term Trend: Decline of 10-30%

Comments: Trend over the past 10 years or three generations is uncertain but likely still declining.

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Population

Population
This species is represented by a small number of occurrences; apparently it occurs in only two rivers (Frio and Sabinal).

Abundance has declined appreciably since 1975-1980, especially in the Sabinal River (Richardson and Gold 1995).

Trend over the past 10 years or three generations is uncertain but probably still declining.

Population Trend
Decreasing
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Threats

Endangered (EN) (B2ab(iii))
  • IUCN 2006 2006 IUCN red list of threatened species. www.iucnredlist.org. Downloaded July 2006.
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Comments: Threatened by habitat alteration resulting from dewatering, overgrazing by cattle, and possible stream pollution from pesticides and other agricultural chemicals (Richardson and Gold 1995).

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Major Threats
Threatened by habitat alteration resulting from dewatering, overgrazing by cattle, and possible stream pollution from pesticides and other agricultural chemicals (Richardson and Gold 1995).
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions

This species would benefit from habitat restoration, improved habitat protection and management, species management, and better information on distribution, abundance, population trend, and threats.

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Names and Taxonomy

Taxonomy

Comments: Removed from genus Notropis and placed in genus (formerly subgenus) Cyprinella by Mayden (1989); this change was adopted in the 1991 AFS checklist (Robins et al. 1991). Formerly included in C. lutrensis (see Matthews 1987), with which lepida has hybridized, but only after dredging operations had started in the Guadalupe River (Mayden 1989). Natural hybridization with C. venusta has been reported.

Richardson and Gold (1995) examined restriction site variation of mtDNA and found that C. lepida in the Frio and Sabinal rivers is distinct from C. lepida in the Nueces River. They concluded that the population in the Nueces River is not the same species as that represented in the Frio and Sabinal rivers. Acknowledging a potentially confusing nomenclatural problem, they referred to the Frio-Sabinal populations as C. lepida and the Nueces population as Cyprinella sp. The problem is that although C. lepida was described from Frio River samples, almost all of the morphological information reported under the name C. lepida is from fishes from the Nueces River. Broughton and Gold (2000) examined mtDNA variation in Cyprinella and found that this species was not monophyletic and thus may represent multiple species.

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