Overview

Comprehensive Description

Biology

Usually found offshore but was also recorded from shore pools (Ref. 5299). Found in shoals (Ref. 27121). Juveniles epipelagic, adults migrate to deeper waters, and large adults are only recorded from demersal trawls (Ref. 27121). Feeds on phytoplankton and preyed upon by fishes, penguins, Cape cormorants, and fur seals (Ref. 27121). Although targeted by purse seines, it may also be caught incidentally in trawls (Ref. 27121). Prefer cooler waters of 11° to 15°C (Ref. 36731).
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Distribution

Eastern Atlantic: Namibia and South Africa.
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Eastern Atlantic.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Dorsal spines (total): 7; Dorsal soft rays (total): 12 - 13; Analspines: 1; Analsoft rays: 12 - 13
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Size

Maximum size: 130 mm ---
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Max. size

17.0 cm TL (male/unsexed; (Ref. 36731))
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Diagnostic Description

Fins dusky to black in color (Ref. 2798).
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Ecology

Habitat

Environment

demersal; marine; depth range 0 - 340 m (Ref. 27121)
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Depth range based on 271 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 151 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 10 - 953
  Temperature range (°C): 7.780 - 14.480
  Nitrate (umol/L): 8.299 - 29.014
  Salinity (PPS): 34.616 - 35.258
  Oxygen (ml/l): 1.685 - 4.998
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.824 - 2.221
  Silicate (umol/l): 6.928 - 20.533

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 10 - 953

Temperature range (°C): 7.780 - 14.480

Nitrate (umol/L): 8.299 - 29.014

Salinity (PPS): 34.616 - 35.258

Oxygen (ml/l): 1.685 - 4.998

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.824 - 2.221

Silicate (umol/l): 6.928 - 20.533
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Depth: 0 - 340m.
Recorded at 340 meters.

Habitat: demersal.
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Trophic Strategy

Feeds on phytoplanlton and benthic invertebrates (Ref. 27637, 27121).
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Conservation

Threats

Not Evaluated
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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Importance

fisheries: minor commercial; price category: very high; price reliability: very questionable: based on ex-vessel price for species in this family
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Wikipedia

Sufflogobius bibarbatus

Sufflogobius bibarbatus, the Bearded Goby or Pelagic Goby, is a species of goby native to the southeastern Atlantic Ocean. It is currently the only known member of its genus.[1]

Description[edit]

It reaches a maximum length of 17 centimeters (6.7 in). It has 7 dorsal spines and 12-13 dorsal soft rays. It has a single anal spine and 12-13 anal soft rays. Its fins are dusky to black in color.[1]

Range and habitat[edit]

This goby is demersal, inhabiting depths of 0–340 metres (0–1,115 ft) in subtropical waters ranging from 11–15 °C (52–59 °F) in the coastal waters of Namibia and South Africa.[1]

The bearded goby is usually found offshore but was also recorded in shore pools. Juveniles are epipelagic, while adults migrate to deeper waters, and large adults are only recorded from demersal trawls.[1]

The gobies can stay on the ocean floor for at least 10 to 12 hours at a time in an area of de-oxygenated "toxic sludge" rich in hydrogen sulfide H
2
S
where hardly anything lives except bacteria and nematodes. When settled on the bottom, they remain alert, showing rapid escape responses. They use the toxic mud as a refuge. Their population is growing despite the fact that they are now the main prey species in this unusual ecosystem.[2]

Feeding[edit]

In 2010 was observed to feed on a species of jellyfish which was understood to be its main predator.[2][3] Jellies provide up to 1/3 of the fish's diet. It hides from mackerel amongst the jellies' stinger-covered tentacles when it rises from the seafloor for nighttime feeding.[4]

Predation[edit]

Fishes, penguins, Cape cormorants, crested terns and fur seals and jellies eat this fish.[1]

This goby hides from predators within jelly tentacles when it rises to feed and reoxygenate its blood.

Although targeted by purse seines, it may also be caught incidentally in trawls.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2013). "Sufflogobius bibarbatus" in FishBase. June 2013 version.
  2. ^ a b "'Prey Fish Turns Predator' ondiscovery.com". 
  3. ^ Utne-Palm, A. C.; Salvanes, A. G. V.; Currie, B.; Kaartvedt, S.; Nilsson, G. E.; Braithwaite, V. A.; Stecyk, J. A. W.; Hundt, M.; Van Der Bank, M.; Flynn, B.; Sandvik, G. K.; Klevjer, T. A.; Sweetman, A. K.; Brüchert, V.; Pittman, K.; Peard, K. R.; Lunde, I. G.; Strandabø, R. A. U.; Gibbons, M. J. (2010). "Trophic Structure and Community Stability in an Overfished Ecosystem". Science 329 (5989): 333–336. doi:10.1126/science.1190708. PMID 20647468.  edit
  4. ^ Biello, David (July 15, 2010). "Scourge of the Jellies: Small Fish Shows How Ecosystems Adjust to Potentially Catastrophic Changes". Retrieved December 2010. 

Miller, P.J. 1990


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