Overview

Comprehensive Description

Lepidorhombus whiffiagonis (Walbaum, 1792)

Mediterranean Sea : 24000-776 (1 spc.), April 2003 , Iskenderun Bay , trawl , C. Dalyan .

  • Nurettin Meriç, Lütfiye Eryilmaz, Müfit Özulug (2007): A catalogue of the fishes held in the Istanbul University, Science Faculty, Hydrobiology Museum. Zootaxa 1472, 29-54: 52-52, URL:http://www.zoobank.org/urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:428F3980-C1B8-45FF-812E-0F4847AF6786
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Biology

Occurs on soft bottoms. Depth range from 100-400 m (Ref. 06302) and from 288-700 m in the eastern Ionian Sea (Ref. 56504). Feeds on small bottom-living fishes as well as on squids and crustaceans (Ref. 4703). Spawns in deep waters off Iceland and west of the British Isles (Ref. 35388).
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Description

The megrim is a relatively narrow-bodied left-eyed flatfish with a moderately large head and large eyes and mouth. The lower eye is slightly forward of the upper eye and the lower jaw is forward of the upper jaw. The background colour is usually a pale yellowish-brown with darker dusky patches. The underside is white. Adult fish can grow to 60cm in length although most are between 35-45cm. This species is similar to the four-spot megrim (Lepidorhombus boscii), however in this species the eyes are level with one another and there are two black spots on the end of both the dorsal and anal fins.
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Distribution

Western Baltic Sea, North Sea, Mediterranean Sea, eastern Atlantic: Iceland and Norway to Western Sahara.
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Northeast Atlantic: Iceland southward to Cape Bojador (26°N), West Sahara and in the western Mediterranean.
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This species is widespread around the coasts of Britain and Ireland but appears to be absent from the east coast of England and the eastern half of the English Channel.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Dorsal spines (total): 0; Dorsal soft rays (total): 85 - 94; Analsoft rays: 64 - 74
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Size

Maximum size: 600 mm TL
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Max. size

60.0 cm TL (male/unsexed; (Ref. 3397))
  • Bauchot, M.-L. 1987 Poissons osseux. p. 891-1421. In W. Fischer, M.L. Bauchot and M. Schneider (eds.) Fiches FAO d'identification pour les besoins de la pêche. (rev. 1). Méditerranée et mer Noire. Zone de pêche 37. Vol. II. Commission des Communautés Européennes and FAO, Rome. (Ref. 3397)   http://www.fishbase.org/references/FBRefSummary.php?id=3397&speccode=2504 External link.
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Diagnostic Description

Dorsal fin origin closer to tip of snout than to anterior edge of eye. Dorsal and anal fins terminate just a little on the blind side of the caudal peduncle. Lateral line forms a distinct curve above the pectoral fin. Dorsal and anal fin with indefinite darker spots posteriorly.
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Ecology

Habitat

Depth: 100 - 400m.
From 100 to 400 meters.

Habitat: bathydemersal.
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Environment

bathydemersal; marine; depth range 100 - 700 m (Ref. 56504)
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Depth range based on 34321 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 29134 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): -9 - 860
  Temperature range (°C): 6.506 - 14.396
  Nitrate (umol/L): 2.055 - 17.472
  Salinity (PPS): 22.343 - 35.698
  Oxygen (ml/l): 4.425 - 7.118
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.225 - 1.053
  Silicate (umol/l): 1.819 - 10.823

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): -9 - 860

Temperature range (°C): 6.506 - 14.396

Nitrate (umol/L): 2.055 - 17.472

Salinity (PPS): 22.343 - 35.698

Oxygen (ml/l): 4.425 - 7.118

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.225 - 1.053

Silicate (umol/l): 1.819 - 10.823
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Mostly found on soft mud or muddy sand at depths between 50-300m. It mainly feeds on other fish e.g. sandeels, dragonets and gobies.
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Trophic Strategy

Feeds mainly on fish, but also squids and crustaceans (Ref. 4703).
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Lepidorhombus whiffiagonis

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 7 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.  Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.  See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

ACCCTATACCTTATCTTCGGAGCCTGGGCCGGAATAGTGGGCACAGGCCTG---AGTCTACTCATTCGCGCTGAACTCAGCCAGCCGGGAGCCCTCCTCGGCGAT---GATCAGATCTACAATGTAATTGTAACAGCACATGCTTTCGTAATAATTTTCTTCATAGTCATGCCCGTAATGATCGGAGGCTTTGGTAACTGGCTTATCCCCCTCATG---CTGGGGGCCCCCGATATAGCATTCCCCCGAATGAACAATATGAGCTTTTGGCTCCTCCCCCCTTCTTTCCTTCTCCTCCTAGCCTCCTCTGGGGTAGAAGCCGGTGCAGGGACTGGGTGAACCGTCTACCCCCCTTTAGCAGGAAACCTCGCCCACGCCGGGGCGTCTGTCGACCTA---ACCATTTTTTCTTTACACTTAGCAGGGATTTCCTCCATTCTAGGAGCTATTAACTTCATTACAACTATTATCAACATAAAACCCGCTACTGTCACCATGTACCAAATCCCACTATTCGTCTGAGCAGTTCTTATTACAGCTGTCCTCCTTCTTCTATCCCTCCCAGTCTTAGCTGCG---GGAATTACAATGCTACTAACAGACCGCAACCTAAACACCGCCTTCTTTGACCCTGCGGGAGGAGGGGACCCCATTTTATACCAACACCTG------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------TTG
-- end --

Download FASTA File
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Lepidorhombus whiffiagonis

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 9
Specimens with Barcodes: 19
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Threats

Not Evaluated
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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Importance

fisheries: highly commercial; price category: very high; price reliability: reliable: based on ex-vessel price for this species
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Wikipedia

Megrim

This article is about the fish. For the neurological condition, see migraine.

The megrim or whiff (Lepidorhombus whiffiagonis) is a species of left-eyed flatfish in the family Scophthalmidae. It is found in the northeast Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea between 100 and 700 m (330 and 2,300 ft) below sea level.[1] It is caught commercially in some countries.[1]

Description[edit]

It can grow up to 60 cm (24 in) in length.[1] It is left-eyed, has a slightly larger head than usual in flatfish, and with a narrower body than usual. The dorsal and anal fins are relatively short and start far back on the body. The colouration is usually light brown with dark spots across the body and dark grey fins. It lacks the highly distinct dark spots found on the fins in its close relative, the four-spot megrim (L. boscii).

Habits[edit]

The megrim prefers a sandy or muddy sea floor. They are predators and eat small fish and squid and also consume crustaceans. In turn megrim are themselves prey for larger species such as sharks, seals and large cod. Megrim spawn in deep waters off Iceland and the west of Ireland, while there is a separate spawning population in the Mediterranean.[2]

Range[edit]

This species is found throughout European waters and the Northeast Atlantic including the Sea of the Hebrides.[3] Megrim are also found off the north coast of Africa and in parts of the Mediterranean.[2]

Commercial value[edit]

Megrim are commercially valuable and are caught by a number of nations around Europe. It is caught by bottom trawling and is directly targeted in some fisheries, whereas in others it is retained as a valuable bycatch.[4] France and Spain are the largest consumers of this species with most of the megrim caught in British water being exported to these nations. However, there has been a drive in Britain to get people to eat more megrim as a way of taking pressure off overexploited fish such as cod and haddock.[5] Megrim can be cooked in a number of different ways with grilling, baking, frying and poaching all effective ways of preparing this species. In the UK megrim is sometimes given an alternative name such as megrim sole and Cornish sole as a way of making this species more appealing to consumers.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2014). "Lepidorhombus whiffiagonis" in FishBase. May 2014 version.
  2. ^ a b c "Megrim". Britishseafishing.co.uk. Retrieved 19 January 2014. 
  3. ^ C.Michael Hogan, (2011) Sea of the Hebrides. Eds. P. Saundry & C.J.Cleveland. Encyclopedia of Earth. National Council for Science and the Environment. Washington DC.
  4. ^ "Species Guide - Megrim". Seafish. Retrieved 20 January 2014. 
  5. ^ "Pass notes No 2,992: The megrim". The Guardian. 13 June 2011. Retrieved 19 January 2014. 
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