Overview

Comprehensive Description

Biology

Adults inhabit rivers (Ref. 4832). Are diurnal species and usually solitary. They burrow occasionally. Feed on plants. Spawning season generally coincides with the southwest monsoon. Spawning occurs in flooded rivers. Fecundity varies from 226,000 to 2,794,000 depending upon the length and weight of the fish and weight of the ovary. Widely introduced outside its native range for stocking reservoirs and aquaculture. Utilized fresh (Ref. 9987).
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Distribution

Range Description

It occurs widely in northern and central India, Bangladesh, Nepal, Myanmar and Pakistan (Talwar and Jhingran 1991). It has been introduced into some of the rivers of peninsular India and Sri Lanka.
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Asia: Pakistan, India, Bangladesh, Myanmar and Nepal.
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Asia: India, Pakistan, Nepal, Sri Lanka; introduced widely in Asia.
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Physical Description

Size

Maximum size: 2000 mm TL
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Max. size

200 cm TL (male/unsexed; (Ref. 9987)); max. published weight: 45.0 kg (Ref. 9987); max. reported age: 10 years (Ref. 56)
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Diagnostic Description

Dorsal fin with 12-14 1/2 branched rays; lower profile of head conspicuously arched; short dorsal fin with anterior branched rays shorter than head; 12-16 predorsal scales ; snout without lateral lobe (Ref. 43281).
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
Rohu is the natural inhabitant of freshwater sections of the rivers. Rohu thrives well in all fresh waters below an altitude of approximately 549 m. Rohu is a bottom feeder and prefers to feed on plant matter including decaying vegetation. Rohu is a bottom feeder and prefers to feed on plant matter including decaying vegetation. Rohu attains maturity towards the end of the second year in ponds. The spawning season of rohu generally coincides with the southwest monsoon. Spawning takes place in flooded rivers. The fecundity of rohu varies from 226,000 to 2,794,000, depending upon the length and weight of the fish and weight of the ovary . The spawn of this fish is collected from rivers during monsoon and reared in tanks and lakes (Talwar and Jhingran 1991).

Systems
  • Freshwater
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Environment

benthopelagic; potamodromous (Ref. 51243); freshwater; brackish; depth range 5 - ? m (Ref. 4832)
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Migration

Potamodromous. Migrating within streams, migratory in rivers, e.g. Saliminus, Moxostoma, Labeo. Migrations should be cyclical and predictable and cover more than 100 km.
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Trophic Strategy

Inhabits rivers (Ref. 4832). A diurnal species and usually solitary. Burrows occasionally. Maximum altitude at 500 m and minimum temperature of 14°C. Feeds on detritus, plants and invertebrates (Ref. 11027). Reproductive migration during the monsoon season towards shallow waters of flood plains. Non-spawning adults usually found feeding in littoral zones.
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Diseases and Parasites

White spot Disease. Parasitic infestations (protozoa, worms, etc.)
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Water mold Disease (l.). Fungal diseases
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Water mold Disease (e.). Fungal diseases
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Trichodinosis. Parasitic infestations (protozoa, worms, etc.)
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Thelohanellus Infection 2. Parasitic infestations (protozoa, worms, etc.)
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Sporozoa-infection (Myxobolus sp.). Parasitic infestations (protozoa, worms, etc.)
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Sachalinorhynchus Disease. Parasitic infestations (protozoa, worms, etc.)
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Neascus Disease. Parasitic infestations (protozoa, worms, etc.)
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Ichthyophthirius Disease. Parasitic infestations (protozoa, worms, etc.)
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Fish louse Infestation 1. Parasitic infestations (protozoa, worms, etc.)
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Dactylogyrus Gill Flukes Disease. Parasitic infestations (protozoa, worms, etc.)
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Aeromonosis. Bacterial diseases
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Life History and Behavior

Life Cycle

Spawns in middle reaches of rivers, where flood water spreads in more or less limpid shallows over fertile flats, well above tidal reaches; also in reservoirs and bundh-type tanks.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Labeo rohita

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 35
Specimens with Barcodes: 47
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Barcode data: Labeo rohita

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 9 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.  Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.  See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

CTTTATCTTGTATTTGGTGCCTGAGCCGGAATAGTAGGAACCGCCTTA---AGCCTTCTTATCCGGGCTGAACTAAGCCAACCCGGATCGCTTCTAGGTGAT---GACCAAATTTATAATGTTATTGTAACTGCCCACGCCTTCGTAATAATTTTCTTTATAGTAATGCCCATCCTCATTGGAGGATTTGGGAACTGACTCGTGCCACTAATG---ATTGGAGCCCCAGACATGGCATTCCCCCGTATAAACAACATAAGCTTCTGACTCCTACCCCCATCATTCCTATTACTATTAGCCTCTTCCGGTGTAGAAGCTGGAGCTGGGACAGGATGGACAGTATACCCACCTCTTGCAGGCAACTTAGCCCACGCAGGAGCATCAGTAGACCTA---ACAATTTTCTCACTTCACTTAGCAGGAGTTTCATCAATTCTAGGGGCTATTAATTTTATTACTACAACTATTAATATGAAACCTCCAGCCATCTCACAATATCAAACACCCTTATTCGTCTGATCTGTCCTAGTAACCGCCGTACTACTTCTCCTCTCACTACCAGTACTGGCCGCT---GGAATCACAATGCTTTTAACAGATCGAAATCTGAATACTACATTCTTCGACCCGGCAGGAGGAGGGGACCCAATCCTTTATCAACACCTA------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------TTC
-- end --

Download FASTA File
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2010

Assessor/s
Dahanukar, N.

Reviewer/s
Juffe Bignoli, D., Chaudhry, S., Kar, D, Rema Devi, K.R. & Datta, N.C.

Contributor/s
Molur, S.

Justification

Labeo rohita is a widespread species with no known major widespread threats. It is also cultured in captivity throughout India and adjacent countries. It is assessed as Least Concern.

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Population

Population
No information is available about the population status of wild populations although this species is very common throughout its range.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats

There are no large scale major threats to the species.

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Least Concern (LC)
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions

Threats to the species in the wild need identification.

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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Importance

fisheries: highly commercial; aquaculture: commercial; gamefish: yes
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Wikipedia

Rohu

For other fishes known as Indian Carp, see Indian Carp.

Rohu or roho labeo (Labeo rohita, Bihar - रोहू मछली, Oriya - ରୋହୀ,)(urdu - رہو)is a species of fish of the carp family, found in rivers in South Asia.[1] It is an omnivore.[2]

It is called rahu in Nepali. In Hindi it is called rehu (rawas is the Indian Salmon, which is quite different). It is called rohi in Oriya, rui in Bengali,rehu in Maithili, rou in Assamese and Sylheti, rohu itself in Malayalam,[citation needed] and is reared in Kerala. It is popular in Thailand, Bangladesh, northern India and Pakistan. It is a non-oily/white fish.

It reaches a maximum length of 2 m (6.6 ft) and a weight of about 110 kg (240 lb).[3]

Biology[edit]

HI THERE!!! During the early stages of its lifecycle, it eats mainly zooplankton, but as it grows, it eats more and more phytoplankton, and as a juvenile or adult is a herbivorous column feeder, eating mainly phytoplankton and submerged vegetation. It has modified, thin hair-like gill rakers, suggesting that it feeds by sieving the water[original research?].

It is diurnal and generally solitary. It reaches sexual maturity between two and five years. In nature, it spawns in the marginal areas of flooded rivers.

It is the main diet of people of Bengal.[citation needed]

Aquaculture[edit]

It is an important aquacultured freshwater species in South Asia.[4] When cultured, it does not breed in lentic environments, so induced spawning becomes necessary.

Preparation as food[edit]

It is treated as a delicacy in Bangladesh, Nepal and the Indian states of Bihar, Odisha, Assam, West Bengal and Uttar Pradesh.[citation needed] The Maithil Brahmins and the Kayastha community of Bihar and Uttar Pradesh treats it as one of their most sacred foods: to be eaten on all auspicious occasions.[citation needed] Rohu is common food in Pakistan and is usually eaten deep fried, or in a sauce with spices.

Fried Rohu dish, Bangladesh.

The roe of rohu is also considered as a delicacy by Bhojpur, Maithili, Oriyas and Bengalis. It is deep fried and served hot as an appetizer as part of an Bihari, Oriya and Bengali meal. It is also stuffed inside pointed gourd to make potoler dolma which is considered a delicacy. Rohu is also served deep fried in mustard oil, as kalia which is a rich gravy made of concoction of spices and deeply browned onions and tok, where the fish is cooked in a tangy sauce made of tamarind and mustard. Rohu is also very popular in northern India and Pakistan such as in the province of Punjab. In Lahore it is a speciality of Lahori cuisine in Lahori fried fish where it is prepared with batter and spices.[citation needed] It is also a very popular food fish in Iraq.[citation needed]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2013). "Labeo rohita" in FishBase. May 2013 version.
  2. ^ "Composite fish culture". Kerelaagriculture.gov.in. Retrieved 2012-03-10. 
  3. ^ Fishing World Records: Labeo rohita. Retrieved 9 May 2013
  4. ^ Development of freshwater fish farming and poverty alleviation - A case study from Bangladesh
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