Overview

Comprehensive Description

Biology

Found on soft bottoms (Ref. 2850). Viviparous (Ref. 34817).
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Distribution

North Pacific: Zhemchug Canyon in the Bering Sea and Amchitka Island in the Aleutian chain to San Diego, California, USA.
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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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North Pacific.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Dorsal spines (total): 13; Dorsal soft rays (total): 13 - 15; Analspines: 3; Analsoft rays: 6 - 7
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Size

Maximum size: 640 mm TL
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Max. size

64.0 cm TL (male/unsexed; (Ref. 2850)); max. published weight: 4,440 g (Ref. 40637); max. reported age: 106 years (Ref. 39247)
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Diagnostic Description

Head spines strong to moderate - nasal, preocular, supraocular, postocular, tympanic (may be absent), coronal and parietal spines present, nuchals usually absent (Ref. 27437). 2nd anal fin spine longer than 3rd (Ref. 27436). Posterior margin of caudal fin almost straight (Ref. 6885). Light pink to red with 4 darker red vertical bars on body (the first extending from front of dorsal to the base of pectoral, the last found on the caudal peduncle), the bars more prominent on smaller fish; 1 dark bar radiating from each eye (Ref. 27436).
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Ecology

Habitat

Environment

demersal; marine; depth range 49 - 625 m (Ref. 6793)
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Depth range based on 438 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 367 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 104 - 512
  Temperature range (°C): 3.546 - 7.760
  Nitrate (umol/L): 21.917 - 42.978
  Salinity (PPS): 33.089 - 34.110
  Oxygen (ml/l): 0.851 - 4.195
  Phosphate (umol/l): 2.044 - 3.176
  Silicate (umol/l): 34.086 - 115.588

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 104 - 512

Temperature range (°C): 3.546 - 7.760

Nitrate (umol/L): 21.917 - 42.978

Salinity (PPS): 33.089 - 34.110

Oxygen (ml/l): 0.851 - 4.195

Phosphate (umol/l): 2.044 - 3.176

Silicate (umol/l): 34.086 - 115.588
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Habitat Type: Marine

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Depth: 49 - 625m.
From 49 to 625 meters.

Habitat: demersal.
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Migration

Non-Migrant: No. All populations of this species make significant seasonal migrations.

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make local extended movements (generally less than 200 km) at particular times of the year (e.g., to breeding or wintering grounds, to hibernation sites).

Locally Migrant: No. No populations of this species make annual migrations of over 200 km.

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Life History and Behavior

Life Expectancy

Lifespan, longevity, and ageing

Maximum longevity: 106 years (wild)
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Sebastes babcocki

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 13 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.  Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.  See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

ATTGGAGGTTTTGGAAACTGGTTAATTCCCCTAATGATTGGAGCCCCAGATATAGCATTTCCTCGTATAAATAACATAAGTTTCTGACTTCTACCCCCTTCTTTCCTACTATTACTTGCCTCTTCTGGAGTAGAAGCGGGTGCCGGAACCGGCTGAACAGTGTACCCGCCCTTAGCCGGTAATTTAGCCCACGCAGGAGCATCAGTCGACCTGACAATCTTTTCACTTCATCTAGCAGGTATTTCCTCAATCCTTGGGGCAATCAATTTTATTACCACAATTATTAATATGAAGCCCCCGGCCATCTCTCAATACCAGACACCCCTGTTTGTGTGAGCCGTCCTAATTACCGCTGTTCTTCTCCTTCTCTCCTTACCAGTTCTCGCTGCCGGCATCACAATGCTCCTTACCGACCGAAATCTTAATACCACCTTCTTTGACCCGGCCGGAGGAGGGGATCCAATCCTTTACCAGCACTTATTCTGGTTTTTTGGACACCCGGAAGTATATATTCTCATTCTACCTGGCTTTGGTATGATTTCACACATCGTCGCCTATTACTCTGGCAAAAAAGAACCCTTTGGTTATATAGGCATGGTATGAGCAATAATGGCTATTGGTCTTCTAGGCTTTATTGTATGAGCCCATCACATATTTACAGTTGGCATGGACGTAGACACGCGTGCTTATTTCACGTCTGCCACAATAATCATCGCAATTCCCACCGGCGTTAAAGTATTTAGCTGACTTGCAACCCTTCAGGGGGGCTCTATTAAATGAGAGACACCCCTTTTATGGGCCCTTGGCTTTATTTTCCTGTTGACAGTAGGGGGGCTTACAGTCATTGTTCTGGGCAATTCATCTCTAGACATTGTACTCCACGATACCTATTATG
-- end --

Download FASTA File
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Sebastes babcocki

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 13
Specimens with Barcodes: 15
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Threats

Not Evaluated
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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Importance

fisheries: minor commercial; price category: medium; price reliability: questionable: based on ex-vessel price for species in this genus
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Wikipedia

Sebastes babcocki

Sebastes babcocki is a species of fish in the rockfish family known by the common name redbanded rockfish.[1] Other common names include bandit, barber pole, flag rockfish, Spanish flag,[2] hollywood, convict, and canary.[3] It is native to the northern and eastern Pacific Ocean. Its distribution extends from the Zhemchug Canyon in the Bering Sea and the Aleutians south to San Diego, California.[1]

This fish reaches up to 64 centimeters in length. Its maximum recorded weight is 4.4 kilograms,[1] and the mean weight is roughly 1.3 kilograms.[4] It is white,[3] pink, or red in color with four vertical red[1] or orange bars,[3] the first one running from the front of the dorsal fin to the pectoral fin and the fourth one at the base of the tail. These bars fade as the fish grows larger. The head is spiny.[1] The fins may have darkened edges or a black tinge.[3]

This long-lived fish has been reported to reach 106 years old.[1][3] The time it takes to reach maturity varies widely, often by geography. A fish off of California might be mature at age 3, while an individual off of British Columbia might take 19 years to mature. Size at maturity varies from 23 to 42 centimeters, with males maturing at smaller sizes than females.[3]

This marine fish lives at ocean depths from 49 to 625 meters,[1] with most between 150 and 350 meters.[3] It can be found on soft seabed,[1] but it also lives on muddy, pebbly, and rocky substrates, sometimes using rocks for cover.[3] It is often solitary but it may join small groups.[4]

Like other rockfish, this species is viviparous. The female releases the live young between March and September across the species' range.[3]

This species has some importance in commercial fisheries, particularly in the northern half of its range. In 1995, 280 tons were caught by longline off of British Columbia. Often, though, this fish is taken as bycatch during trawling operations targeting other species, such as the yelloweye rockfish (S. ruberrimus)[3] and halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis).[4] Bycatch of this species in trawls off the coast of British Columbia well exceeded 1,000 tons in 1992. It has dropped below 300 tons per year since then due to better monitoring.[4]

This fish is host to a number of parasitic copepods, including Chondracanthus pinguis, C. triventricosus, Clavella parva, Colobomatus kyphosus, Naobranchia occidentalis, Peniculus asinus, and Neobrachiella robusta.[5]

References[edit source | edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h Froese, R. and D. Pauly, Eds. Sebastes babcocki. FishBase. 2011.
  2. ^ Common names of Sebastes babcocki. FishBase.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Redbanded rockfish (Sebastes babcocki). Alaska Fisheries Science Center. National Marine Fisheries Service. NOAA.
  4. ^ a b c d Haigh, R. and P. Starr. (2006). A review of redbanded rockfish Sebastes babcocki along the Pacific coast of Canada: biology, distribution, and abundance trends. Canadian Science Advisory Secretariat. Research Document 2006/073. Fisheries and Oceans, Canada.
  5. ^ Bailly, N. (2013). Sebastes babcocki. In: Froese, R. and D. Pauly, Eds. (2013) FishBase. World Register of Marine Species. Accessed 5 June 2013.
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