Overview

Comprehensive Description

Biology

Considered a poor aquarium fish. Is a scavenger-predator with a voracious appetite. This perennial roamer remains still only when it is getting ready to attack a prey. It moves about in small packs, never quietly but at a frantic pace, following the leader in its moves, stopping and digging in the sand when it does so or grazing on the biocover (Ref. 6770). Extreme size dimorphism present among males, with both sizes displaying different behavior and reproductive performance (Ref. 85351).
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Distribution

Range Description

Endemic to Lake Tanganyika where it is very common and widely spread. Also found in the Malagarasi river delta.
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Africa: endemic to Lake Tanganyika.
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Eastern Africa: Lake Tanganyika.
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Physical Description

Size

Maximum size: 124 mm TL
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Max. size

12.4 cm TL (male/unsexed; (Ref. 5654)); 4.5 cm TL (female)
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
Ubiquitous around the Lake, over hard and soft bottoms, including in snail shells, from 0–50 m deep (average depth 7 m). It is a predator mostly feeding on crustaceans and other invertebrates.

Systems
  • Freshwater
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Environment

benthopelagic; freshwater; pH range: 7.0 - 8.5; dH range: 10 - 15
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Trophic Strategy

Feeds on shrimp (Ref. 40115).
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Life History and Behavior

Life Cycle

Males collect empty snail shells which are then carried to the nest site (Ref. 47165). Females enter the shells to spawn and care for the brood, fanning the eggs and larvae for 10-14 days (Ref. 47165).
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2006

Assessor/s
Ntakimazi, G.

Reviewer/s
Snoeks, J. (Freshwater Fish Red List Authority) & Darwall, W. (Freshwater Biodiversity Assessment Programme)

Contributor/s

Justification
Endemic to Lake Tanganyika where it common and widespread throughout the lake. No widespread major threats identified.
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Population

Population
No information available.

Population Trend
Decreasing
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Threats

Major Threats
Siltation in the inshore zone due to erosion on the watershed and beach seining.
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Least Concern (LC)
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
None known.
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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Importance

aquarium: commercial
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Wikipedia

Lamprologus callipterus

Lamprologus callipterus is a species of cichlid endemic to Lake Tanganyika where it very actively moves about in search of crustacean and other invertebrates. Males of this species can reach a length of 12.4 centimetres (4.9 in) TL while the females only grow to 4.5 centimetres (1.8 in) TL (see below). This fish can also be found in the aquarium trade, though it is considered to be poorly suited for captivity.[2]

Physiology[edit]

These fish exhibit strong sexual dimorphism. Its males are significantly larger than females, the reason being that males of the species collect empty snail shells for the females to breed in. Therefore, males have to be large and strong enough to transport shells, while females have to be small enough to fit in the shells.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ntakimazi, G. 2006. Lamprologus callipterus. In: IUCN 2012. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2012.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 21 April 2013.
  2. ^ Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2013). "Lamprologus callipterus" in FishBase. February 2013 version.
  3. ^ Ota, Kazutaka; Masanori Kohda and Tetsu Sato (4 October 2010). "Unusual allometry for sexual size dimorphism in a cichlid where males are extremely larger than females". Journal of Biosciences 35. doi:10.1007/s12038-010-0030-6. Retrieved 4 March 2012. 


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