IUCN threat status:

Vulnerable (VU)

Comprehensive Description

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Biology

Adults inhabit piedmont and montane cold rivers with high oxygen concentrations. They prefer to live in deeper holes with slow current for periods of reduced activity (day time, winter), but also lower reaches, estuaries, cold lakes and reservoirs. Both juveniles and adults are territorial. Adults frequently occur within their own restricted territory (deep holes below rapids and waterfalls, confluence of small tributaries, below bridge pillar or large rocks, bank excavations), which they abandon only foraging and spawning. Young individuals do not maintain permanent territory. Juveniles occur in fast-flowing waters, prey on drifting invertebrates and shift to fish diet after 1-3 years. Adults feed on fishes and terrestrial vertebrates. They breed in shallow places with fast current on pebble bottom, immediately downstream of large deep pools, often in small river tributaries. Usually undertake upriver migration for spawning in the upper reaches of tributaries. Can overcome quite high obstacles while migrating to spawning sites. Eggs, 5-6 mm in diameter, hatch after 28-38 days. Alevins stay in gravel until yolk sac is absorbed after 10-15 days while young first remain near spawning site, then move downstream. Larger immature individuals of 2-4 years of age live in same sites as adults but separately below groups of adults or in smaller holes. Life span reaches up to about 20 years (Ref. 59043). Threatened due to habitat loss, pollution and over harvesting (Ref. 58490), including angling tourism (Ref. 59043).

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Source: FishBase

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