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Overview

Distribution

Central America: Grijalva system, Mexico.
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Baños de Azufre, Atlantic Slope of Mexico.
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Physical Description

Size

Maximum size: 35 mm TL
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Max. size

3.5 cm TL (male/unsexed; (Ref. 50894))
  • Lucinda, P.H.F. 2003 Poeciliidae (Livebearers). p. 555-581. In R.E. Reis, S.O. Kullander and C.J. Ferraris, Jr. (eds.) Checklist of the Freshwater Fishes of South and Central America. Porto Alegre: EDIPUCRS, Brazil. (Ref. 50894)
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Type Information

Paratype for Gambusia eurystoma Miller
Catalog Number: USNM 211263
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Fishes
Collector(s): R. Miller & R. Schultz
Year Collected: 1959
Locality: Mexico: Arroyo Del Azufre At Banos De Azufre, 10 km W. of Teapa, Tabasco. Elev. 150 m, Tabasco, Mexico, North America
  • Paratype: Miller, R. R. 1975. Occasional Papers of the Museum of Zoology, University of Michigan. No. 672: 19.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Systems
  • Freshwater
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Environment

benthopelagic; non-migratory; freshwater; pH range: 7.2 - 7.8; dH range: 5 - 20
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
CR
Critically Endangered

Red List Criteria
A1ac+2ce, B1+2ac, C2b

Version
2.3

Year Assessed
1996
  • Needs updating

Assessor/s
Contreras-Balderas, S. & Almada-Villela, P.

Reviewer/s

Contributor/s

History
  • 1994
    Rare
    (Groombridge 1994)
  • 1990
    Rare
    (IUCN 1990)
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Threats

Critically Endangered (CR) (A1ac+2ce, B1+2ac, C2b)
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Wikipedia

Widemouth gambusia

The widemouth gambusia (Gambusia eurystoma) is a species of fish in the family Poeciliidae of the order Cyprinodontiformes. It is endemic to Mexico, specifically to the Baños del Azufre (Grijalva River basin) near Teapa, Tabasco. The Baños del Azufre are sulfidic springs that contain high concentrations of toxic hydrogen sulfide (H
2
S
). This prevents most animals from living in them; the only other fish found in the toxic sections of Baños del Azufre is the sulphur molly (Poecilia sulphuraria).[1]

This species reaches a maximum overall length around 3.5 cm (1.4 in).

Little is known about G. eurystoma, but the IUCN classifies it as Critically Endangered on the basis of a very small (less than 250 individuals) and rapidly falling population and a small, localized, and diminishing geographical distribution.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tobler; Riesch; García de León; Schlupp; & Plath (2008). Two endemic and endangered fishes, Poecilia sulphuraria (Alvarez, 1948) and Gambusia eurystoma Miller, 1975 (Poeciliidae, Teleostei) as only survivors in a small sulphidic habitat. Journal of Fish Biology 72: 523–533.
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